american Us Navy - United States Navy USS Yorktown (CV-5) (+1942)
report an error
       
  Details  
 
general
nationality american
purpose war
type aircraft carrier
subtype/class Yorktown class aircraft carrier (am.)
propulsion steam turbine
date built 1936
status
live live
details
weight (tons) 29581  disp (surf)
dimensions 252.2 x 34.7 x 8.5 m
material steel
engine 9 x Babcock & Wilcox boilers, 4 x Parsons steam turbines, 4 shafts
armament 8 × 5 in (130 mm)/38 cal dual purpose guns, 20 × 26 ft 9 in (8.15 m)1.1 in/75 cal, 32 × 20 mm anti-aircraft cannons, 90 aircraft
power 120000  s.h.p.
speed 32.5  knots
yard no. 359
about the loss
cause lost naval battle
date lost 04/06/1942  [dd/mm/yyyy]
casualties  max.81rank: 553
about people
builder
Newport News Shipbuilding & Drydock Co., Newport News
engine by
[1] Parsons Marine Steam Turbine Co., Wallsend
[2] Babcock & Wilcox Co. - B&W
owner
Us Navy - United States Navy
captain Elliot Buckmaster, Capt.
complement 2919
about the wreck
status in good state
depth (m.) 5500 max. / -- min. (m)
orientation
position on seabed upright
visibility very bad
sea bed mud
marine life very little
protected
war grave yes
updates
entered by Allen Tony
entered 26/05/2008
last update Gothro Phil
last update 04/06/2012
 
  Position  
 
Pablobini20/02/2009
latitudehydro member
longitudehydro member
AIShydro member
mark add position to my marks (+/-5miles)
dist. homeportdist. homeport
ref. used
  uboat.net
position disp.
show neighbour. wrecks members only
insert new position
 
  The Wreck today  
 

Allen Tony27/05/2008

Fifty-six years after the USS Yorktown sank into a watery Pacific grave at the hands of the Japanese, the world got its first glimpse Thursday of the aircraft carrier's ghostly, but remarkably well-preserved, remains. The team of explorers who located the wreckage of the Yorktown on May 19 unveiled photos and video of the ship, buried under 16,650 feet of water near the Pacific island of Midway, about 1,300 miles west of Hawaii. The ship was sitting upright on the ocean floor, its giant anti-aircraft guns still aimed skyward. The wreck was discovered by a team led by Robert Ballard, the undersea explorer who also found the wrecks of the Titanic and the German battleship Bismarck. 

CNN's Jonathan Karl reports on the discovery Ballard says the Yorktown search was tougher than Titanic because the ocean was a full mile deeper. The first clue that explorers were close came when they saw piles of mud scattered around the ocean floor, a typical pattern caused when a giant ship slams into the sea floor. A meticulous search of the area with sonar turned up "the great steel wall of the Yorktown," Ballard said. "There was absolutely no biological growth on it. It was the most sterile water environment I've ever seen. You could see all the way across the flight deck," he said.

ref. used 
 CNN news


insert wreck site info
 
  Movies  
  insert new movie  
 
  Pictures  
 
copyright: Unknown - onbekend - inconnu
 
 copyright: Unknown - onbekend - inconnu copyright: Unknown - onbekend - inconnu copyright: Unknown - onbekend - inconnu  
 
 copyright: Unknown - onbekend - inconnu copyright: Unknown - onbekend - inconnu copyright: Unknown - onbekend - inconnu copyright: Unknown - onbekend - inconnu 
 
 copyright: Unknown - onbekend - inconnu copyright: Unknown - onbekend - inconnu copyright: Unknown - onbekend - inconnu  
 
insert new picture
 
  History  
 
Lettens Jan12/08/20126 June 1942

At 0410, one of I-168's lookouts spots YORKTOWN about 12 miles away. At 0600, Tanabe spots the first destroyers. He submerges and slows to three knots. As he closes, he sees six destroyers circling a mile away. The minesweeper VIREO has YORKTOWN in tow. At 0605, USS HAMMANN (DD-412) puts a salvage party aboard the carrier. HAMMANN is secured to YORKTOWN's starboard side and provides power for the carrier's pumps and foam to fight the fires.

I-168 arrives and sights the carrier and her screen. For nine hours, Tanabe skillfully makes his approach steering by chart and sound with only a few periscope sightings. Undetected, he penetrates the destroyer and cruiser screen. At 1331, from 1,900 yards, he fires two torpedoes at the overlapping formation, followed by two more three seconds later. ...

read more
ref. used 
 combinedfleet.com
Allen Tony27/05/2008The third USS Yorktown (CV-5), lead ship of her class of aircraft carriers of World War II, was sunk at the Battle of Midway. Yorktown was laid down on 21 May 1934 at Newport News, Virginia, by the Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Co.; launched on 4 April 1936; sponsored by Eleanor Roosevelt; and commissioned at the Naval Operating Base (NOB), Norfolk, Virginia, on 30 September 1937, Capt. Ernest D. McWhorter in command.

Yorktown USS met her fate at the Battle of Midway when she was torpedoed. She did not sink immediately and an attempt was made to salvage her.

Yorktown (CV-5) earned three battle stars for her World War II service; two of them being for the significant part she had played in stopping Japanese expansion and turning the tide of the war at Coral Sea and at Midway.

On 19th May 1998, the wreck of Yorktown was found by Dr. Robert D. Ballard, famous oceanographer and discoverer of the wreck of the Titanic. The wreck was found 3 miles (5 km) beneath the surface and was photographed.
Gothro Phil11/11/2012The Battle of Midway (Japanese: ミッドウェー海戦; Rōmaji: Middowē Kaisen) is widely regarded as the most important naval battle of the Pacific Campaign of World War II. Between 4 and 7 June 1942, only six months after Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor, and one month after the Battle of the Coral Sea, the United States Navy decisively defeated an Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN) attack against Midway Atoll, inflicting irreparable damage on the Japanese fleet.

The Japanese plan was to lure the United States' aircraft carriers into a trap. The Japanese also intended to occupy Midway as part of an overall plan to extend their defensive perimeter in response to the Doolittle Raid. This operation was also considered preparatory for further attacks against Fiji and Samoa....

read more
ref. used 
  en.wikipedia.org


insert new history
 
  Documents  
  insert new document  
About Owners
 
Us Navy - United States Navy

John Paul Jones - An American Naval Hero and known as father of the American Navy.

John Paul was born in a gardener's cottage in Kirkbean, Kirkcudbrightshire, Scotland. He went to sea as a youth and was a merchant shipmaster by the age of twenty-one. After killing a mutinous sailor at Tobago he added 'Jones' to his name and began a new life in America. He volunteered early in the War of Independence to serve in his adopted country's infant navy, and managed to obtain a lieutenant's commission in the Continental Navy.

He took the war to the enemy's homeland with daring raids along the British coast and the famous victory of the BONHOMME RICHARD over the HMS SERAPIS. After the BONHOMME RICHARD began taking on water and fires broke out on board, the British commander asked Jones if he had struck his flag. Jones replied, "I have not yet begun to fight!" In the end, it was the British commander who surrendered. Jones is now remembered for his indomitable will, his unwillingness to consider surrender when the slightest hope of victory still burned.

In 1781 he returned to America and Congress passed a vote of thanks to him for the way he had sustained the honour of the American fleet and in 1787 awarded him a gold medal. He also received a gold sword and the Order of Military Merit from Louis XVI.

Throughout his naval career Jones promoted professional standards and training. He spent the remaining years of the war advising on the establishment of the navy and the training of naval officers.

In 1792 Jones was appointed U.S. Consul to Algiers, but in July of that year he died before the commission arrived. He was buried in Paris and his body lay in an alcohol filled coffin in an unmarked grave for over a century. In 1905 his remains were found and taken to the United States where, in 1913, they were finally laid to rest in a marble sarcophagus in the U.S. Naval Academy Chapel at Annapolis, Maryland

read more
 
About Builders
 Newport News Shipbuilding & Drydock Co., Newport News

Newport News Shipbuilding (NNS), originally Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Company (NNS&DD), was the largest privately-owned shipyard in the United States prior to being purchased by Northrop Grumman in 2001. Known as Northrop Grumman Newport News (NGNN), and later Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding Newport News (NGSB-NN), the company was located in Newport News, Virginia, and often participates in projects with the Norfolk Naval Shipyard in Portsmouth, Virginia, also located adjacent to Hampton Roads.

The shipyard is a major employer not only for the lower Virginia Peninsula, but also portions of Hampton Roads south of the James River and the harbor, portions of the Middle Peninsula region, and even some northeastern counties of North Carolina


read more

Babcock & Wilcox Co. - B&W
In 1867 Stephen Wilcox and partner George Herman Babcock patented the Babcock & Wilcox Non-Explosive Boiler, which used tubing to generate higher pressures and was more efficient than existing designs. In 1891, Babcock & Wilcox Ltd is established as a separate United Kingdom company, to be responsible for all sales outside the US and Cuba.
 
 
  History  
 
Lettens Jan12/08/20126 June 1942

At 0410, one of I-168's lookouts spots YORKTOWN about 12 miles away. At 0600, Tanabe spots the first destroyers. He submerges and slows to three knots. As he closes, he sees six destroyers circling a mile away. The minesweeper VIREO has YORKTOWN in tow. At 0605, USS HAMMANN (DD-412) puts a salvage party aboard the carrier. HAMMANN is secured to YORKTOWN's starboard side and provides power for the carrier's pumps and foam to fight the fires.

I-168 arrives and sights the carrier and her screen. For nine hours, Tanabe skillfully makes his approach steering by chart and sound with only a few periscope sightings. Undetected, he penetrates the destroyer and cruiser screen. At 1331, from 1,900 yards, he fires two torpedoes at the overlapping formation, followed by two more three seconds later.

The first torpedo hits HAMMANN, breaks her back and sinks her in about four minutes. As she goes down, her depth charges explode and kill 81 of her 241-strong crew. At 1332, the next two torpedoes strike YORKTOWN starboard below the bridge. The fourth torpedo misses and passes astern.

At 1336, American destroyers commence a counterattack. A destroyer passes directly overhead and drops two depth charges. After more attacks the forward torpedo room and maneuvering room flood. After battery cells are extensively damaged and all crew dons gas masks. The outer and inner doors of torpedo tube No. 1 spring and admit water. The lights go out and the emergency lights come on.

At 1640, with his batteries nearly exhausted, Tanabe battle surfaces determined to go down fighting, but three destroyers USS GWIN (DD-433), HUGHES (DD-410) and MONAGHAN (DD-354) are about five miles away. Tanabe sets off at the best speed I-168 can now make - only 14 knots. Tanabe signals to the flagship of the Combined Fleet YAMATO that he has attacked and sunk the YORKTOWN. One destroyer closes within 5,470 yards, firing intermittently. After the emergency repair of an electric engine is completed, Tanabe submerges again. I-168 stays down until 2000 and then resurfaces. During 13 hours of chase, she has been attacked with some 40 depth-charges.
ref. used 
 combinedfleet.com

Gothro Phil11/11/2012The Battle of Midway (Japanese: ミッドウェー海戦; Rōmaji: Middowē Kaisen) is widely regarded as the most important naval battle of the Pacific Campaign of World War II. Between 4 and 7 June 1942, only six months after Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor, and one month after the Battle of the Coral Sea, the United States Navy decisively defeated an Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN) attack against Midway Atoll, inflicting irreparable damage on the Japanese fleet.

The Japanese plan was to lure the United States' aircraft carriers into a trap. The Japanese also intended to occupy Midway as part of an overall plan to extend their defensive perimeter in response to the Doolittle Raid. This operation was also considered preparatory for further attacks against Fiji and Samoa.

Typical of Japanese naval planning Yamamoto's battle plan was exceedingly complex. However, Yamamoto did not know the U.S. had broken the main Japanese naval code (dubbed JN-25 by the Americans) and were waiting to spring their own trap.

In the ensuing battle the Japanese would strike first at the Marine Corp Base on Midway Island followed by reprisal attacks from the American task force consisting of the carriers USS Enterprise, USS Hornet and USS Yorktown.

After two failed torpedo attacks, the Americans drew first blood by hitting the Kaga and four minutes later the Akagi and Sōryū in simultaneous attacks by American SBDs dive bombers from Enterprise and Yorktown (VB-6, VS-6 and VB-3, respectively).

With three carriers dead in the water the Japanese would strike back as the Hiryū would muster enough planes to attack the Yorktown and disable her. The United States would counterattack by sinking the last Japanese carrier Hiryu with great loss of life.

Meanwhile, salvage efforts on Yorktown were encouraging, and she was taken in tow by USS Vireo. In the late afternoon of 6 June, however, Yorktown was struck by two torpedoes from I-168. There were few casualties, since most of the crew had already been evacuated, but a third torpedo from this salvo struck and sank the destroyer USS Hammann, which had been providing auxiliary power to Yorktown. Hammann broke in two with the loss of 80 lives, most due to her own depth charges exploding. Yorktown lingered until just after 05:00 on 7 June.

The toll? Four Japanese aircraft carriers, Kaga, Hiryu, Soryu, Akagi and the heavy cruiser Mikuma were sunk for a cost of one American carrier, USS Yorktown and destroyer USS Hammann.
ref. used 
  en.wikipedia.org
 
 
The World
pref. Google
 
 
WRECKS: DISABLED zoom out zoom in view full chart
chart
USS Yorktown (CV-5) (+1942)
The World
More charts
San Diego to Aleutian Islands and Hawaiian Islands The World
 
 
  Update statistics  
 
  Advertisement  
 
advertise
 
   
  search  
 
You may consider access to
search wreck
show prev. names
A-Z search
 
search chart:
chart catalogue
 
search owner/builder: