japanese Imperial Japanese Navy - IJN - 大日本帝国海軍 IJN Fuso (+1944)
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general
nationality japanese
purpose war
type battleship
subtype/class Fuso class battleship (jpn.)
propulsion steam
date built 1914
is nickname no
status
unknown
details
weight (tons) 41348  disp (surf)
dimensions 205.1 x 30.6 x 9.7 m
material steel, armoured
engine 4 × Brown-Curtis turbines, 24 × Miyabara boilers, 4 × shafts
armament 12 × 356 mm (14 in)/45 cal guns, 16 × 152 mm (6 in) guns, 8 × 127 mm (5 in) DP guns, 95 × 25 mm (1 in) A.A. guns, 10 × 13.2 mm (0.52 in) A.A. machine guns, 3 float planes
power 40000  s.h.p.
speed 25  knots
about the loss
cause lost torpedo
other reasons explosion
date lost 25/10/1944  [dd/mm/yyyy]
casualties  max.1620rank: 51
about people
builder
Kure Naval Dockyards, Kure
owner
Imperial Japanese Navy - IJN - 大日本帝国海軍
captain Rear Admiral Ban Masami
no. of crew 1630
about the wreck
depth (m.)
orientation
protected
war grave yes
updates
entered by Lettens Jan
entered 16/05/2008
last update Thommy44
last update 13/06/2014
 
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Lettens Jan16/05/2008
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  History  
 
Allen Tony15/08/2008FUSO HIJMS was a Japanese battleship (39,154 tons) sunk during the Battle of Surigao Strait, Leyte, by a torpedo from the American destroyer USS Melvin.

Badly damaged, she lost speed and fell out of formation only to blow up in a cataclysmic explosion half an hour later at 03.40hrs.

The Fuso (Admiral Masami Ban) broke in two parts, the two sections remaining afloat and blazing furiously only a short distance from the northern tip of Kanihaan Island.

The bow section was sunk by gunfire from the USS Louisville and the stern section sank half an hour later after having drifted with the current for some distance.

Many survivors swimming in the sea refused to be rescued by the US ships. The Japanese destroyer Asagumo may have, or may not have, rescued some of Fuso´s survivors but she herself was torpedoed and sunk with all on board some four hours later.

Those that survived the sinking of the Fuso and made it to shore, were butchered by Philippine natives out for revenge.

The entire crew of the Fuso therefore died, the exact number is not known but estimates put her full complement at just over 1,400 men.
ref. used 
 Martime Disasters of WWII
Lettens Jan24/05/2010The Battle of Leyte Gulf (23-27 October 1944)

October 23rd

U. S. submarine Bream (SS-243) torpedoes heavy cruiser Aoba off Manila Bay. Aoba, however does not sink.

Subsequently, submarines Darter (SS-227) and Dace (SS-247) attack what proves to be the "Center Force" (Vice Admiral Kurita Takeo), one of the three main bodies of the Japanese fleet moving toward Leyte in a major effort to drive U.S. forces from the Philippines.

Dace sinks heavy cruiser Maya, while Darter sinks heavy cruiser Atago and damages her sistership Takao. ...

read more
ref. used 
 Cressman R. J., Official Chronology of the U.S. Navy in WWII
Lettens Jan16/05/2008On October 25th 1944, HIJMS Fuso, a battleship, was sunk by Gunfire from TF77 in the Battle of Leyte Gulf, Phase 3, The Battle of Surigao Strait.

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  History  
 
Lettens Jan24/05/2010The Battle of Leyte Gulf (23-27 October 1944)

October 23rd

U. S. submarine Bream (SS-243) torpedoes heavy cruiser Aoba off Manila Bay. Aoba, however does not sink.

Subsequently, submarines Darter (SS-227) and Dace (SS-247) attack what proves to be the "Center Force" (Vice Admiral Kurita Takeo), one of the three main bodies of the Japanese fleet moving toward Leyte in a major effort to drive U.S. forces from the Philippines.

Dace sinks heavy cruiser Maya, while Darter sinks heavy cruiser Atago and damages her sistership Takao.

October 24th

Planes from TG 38.2, TG 38.3, and TG 38.4 attack the Japanese "Center Force" (Vice Admiral Kurita Takeo) in the Sibuyan Sea. Planes from carriers Enterprise (CV-6), Intrepid (CV-11), and Franklin (CV-13), and small carrier Cabot (CVL-29) sink battleship Musashi south of Luzon.

Aircraft from the three task groups also damage battleships Yamato and Nagato, heavy cruiser Tone, and destroyers Kiyoshimo, Fujinami and Uranami.

TG 38.4 planes attack Japanese "Southern Force" (Vice Admiral Nishimura Shoji and Vice Admiral Shima Kiyohide) as it proceeds through the Sulu Sea.

Planes from Franklin sink destroyer Wakaba off the west coast of Panay, aircraft from Enterprise and Franklin damage battleships Fuso and Yamashiro. Japanese planes, however, attack TG 38.3; combat air patrol and effective use of rain squalls as cover limits the damage to small carrier Princeton (CVL-23), hit by bomb from dive bomber.

In trying to save Princeton, however, light cruiser Birmingham (CL-62) and destroyers Morrison (DD-560), Gatling (DD-671), and Irwin (DD-794) are damaged by rolling against the stricken carrier or by fragments from the explosion of Princeton's magazines when fires gain the upper hand; in addition, Morrison's bridge is damaged by a jeep (used to tow aircraft) falling from Princeton's flight deck.

Birmingham suffers the greatest destruction because she is alongside the carrier when the latter's magazines explode. The cruiser's decks literally run red with blood: 229 men killed, four missing, 211 seriously wounded and 215 with minor wounds. Ultimately, light cruiser Reno and Irwin scuttle Princeton.

U.S. freighter Augustus Thomas, anchored in San Pedro Bay, Leyte, is attacked by a Japanese plane. The kamikaze presses home his attack, a wing striking the stack of the nearby tug Sonoma (ATO-12) before it crashes the freighter's starboard side. The bombs detonate in the water between the two ships and the exploding suicider sets Sonoma afire. There are no casualties on board Augustus Thomas (41-man merchant complement, 27-man Armed Guard and 480 troop passengers), which is subsequently beached by tugs Chowanoc (ATF-100) and Whippoorwill (ATO-169). Sonoma sinks off Dio Island.

October 25th

TG 77.2 (Rear Admiral Jesse B. Oldendorf), augmented by TG 77.3 (Rear Admiral Russell S. Berkey) and TG 70.1 (39 motor torpedo boats) execute the classic maneuver of "crossing the tee" of the Japanese "Southern Force" (Vice Admiral Nishimura Shoji and Vice Admiral Shima Kiyohide) in the Battle of Surigao Strait.

TG 70.1 begins the action against the Japanese ships. PT-137 torpedoes light cruiser Abukuma, but PT-493 is sunk by enemy secondary battery gunfire.

DESRON 54 (Captain Jesse G.Coward) then attacks. McDermut (DD-677) sinks destroyer Yamagumo and damages destroyers Asagumo and Michisio.

Subsequently, light cruiser Denver (CL-58) sinks Asagumo at the entrance of Surigao Strait.

DESRON 24 (Captain Kenmore M. McManes) enters the fray and Hutchins (DD-476) (McManes's flagship) sinks Michishio.

DESRON 56 (Captain Roland M. Smoot) attacks. Albert W. Grant (DD-649) is damaged by both friendly and Japanese gunfire at this phase of the battle.

Two Australian warships take part in this fleet action. Heavy cruiser HMAS Shropshire (in TG 77.3) and destroyer HMAS Arunta (in DESRON 24) see the destruction of battleships Fuso and Yamashiro.

Heavy cruiser Mogami and destroyer Shigure are damaged.

Meanwhile, the "Center Force" (Vice Admiral Kurita Takeo), which includes four battleships and five heavy cruisers, having passed into the Philippine Sea during the night, surprises TG 77.4 (Rear Admiral Thomas L.Sprague) off Samar. Kurita's force wreaks havoc on the six escort carriers, three destroyers and four destroyer escorts of TU 77.4.3 (northernmost carrier force) (Rear Admiral Clifton A. F. Sprague).

In this battle, which becomes a precipitate flight in the face of an overwhelming enemy force, Kurita's ships inflict severe damage but emerge bloodied by the Homeric efforts of the "small boys" (destroyers and destroyer escorts) and planes from the escort carriers that compel Kurita to retire, inexplicably, without destroying the CVEs and their consorts in detail.

In the Battle off Samar, Japanese surface gunfire sinks destroyers Hoel, Johnston and destroyer escort Samuel B. Roberts (DE-413). Destroyer Heermann (DD-523), E and destroyer escort Dennis (DE-405) are damaged. Johnston damages heavy cruiser Kumano.

Japanese surface gunfire (either battleship Haruna or Kongo) straddles escort carrier White Plains (CVE-66), St. Lo (CVE-63), and Kitkun Bay (CVE- 71) but scores no direct hits. Heavy cruisers Chikuma, Haguro, Chokai, light cruiser Noshiro and a destroyer sink escort carrier Gambier Bay (CVE-73).

Japanse surface gunfire also damages Fanshaw Bay (CVE-70) and Kalinin Bay (CVE-68). Navy carrier-based aircraft damage battleships Kongo (from near-misses) and Yamato and heavy cruisers Chikuma, Chokai, and Suzuya.

Subsequently, Japanese planes attack escort carriers of TU 77.4.1 (Rear Admiral Thomas L. Sprague). Suwannee (CVE-27) is damaged by kamikazes and Santee (CVE-29) by suicide plane and Japanese submarine I-56. Kamikazes near-miss Sangamon and Petrof Bay (CVE-80). Destroyer escort Richard M. Rowell is damaged by strafing.

Following its ordeal off Samar, TU 77.4.3 (Rear Admiral Clifton A.F. Sprague) comes under Japanese air attack. Kamikazes sink St. Lo and damage Kalinin Bay and Kitkun Bay.

At the same time, in the Battle off Cape Engano, carrier aircraft from the Third Fleet (Admiral William F. Halsey, Jr.) strike the Japanese "Northern Force" (Vice Admiral Ozawa Jisaburo). Planes from carriers Essex and Lexington sink carrier Zuikaku, 220 nautical miles east-northeast of Cape Engano and carrier Chitose 235 nautical miles east of Cape Engano. Carrier Chiyoda, damaged by planes from carriers Lexington and Franklin and small carrier Langley, is sunk by heavy cruisers New Orleans and Wichita and light cruisers Santa Fe and Mobile (CL-63) 260 nautical miles southeast of Cape Engano.

Carrier Zuiho is sunk by planes from Essex, Franklin, Lexington, Enterprise, and small carrier San Jacinto east-northeast of Cape Engano.
ref. used 
 Cressman R. J., Official Chronology of the U.S. Navy in WWII
 
 
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IJN Fuso (+1944)
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