dutch Koninklijke Nederlandsche Stoomboot Maatschappij (KNSM) SS Breda [+1940]
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  Details  
 
general
nationality dutch
purpose transport
type cargo ship
propulsion steam
date built 1921
is nickname no
status
live live
details
weight (tons) 6941  grt
dimensions 122 x 17.78 x 10.7 m
material steel
engine 2 steam turbine engines geared to single shaft, 4 boilers
armament 4.7 inch Woolworth gun
power 3300  s.h.p.
speed 11.5  knots
yard no. 107
call sign
PDGH  
PDGH
about the loss
cause lost air raid
date lost 23/12/1940  [dd/mm/yyyy]
casualties 0
about people
builder
Nieuwe Waterweg Scheepsbouwmaatschappij - New Waterway Shipbuilding Co., Schiedam
engine by
Metropolitan-Vickers Electrical Co., Ltd., Manchester
owner
Koninklijke Nederlandsche Stoomboot Maatschappij (KNSM), Amsterdam
captain Fooy, J.
about the wreck
status hull breaking down
depth (m.) 30 max. / 8.2 min. (m)
orientation 80°
position on seabed upright
visibility average
current weak
sea bed mud
protected no
war grave no
references
references
 Racey Carl, A Century of Steamship Losses
updates
entered by Lettens Jan
entered 01/07/2002
last update Vleggeert Nico
last update 12/12/2013
 
  Position  
 
Lettens Jan04/04/2013
latitudeUK hydro member
longitudeUK hydro member
AISUK hydro member
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  The Wreck today  
 

Lettens Jan06/08/2007

Upright, even keel. Gun removed. Bronze propeller and copper salvaged. Explosives used in raising condensers. Sinking into soft seabed. Bow in 24m. Five holds silted, but some cargo can be seen - aircraft in No 1; sandals in No 2; aircraft engines in No 3; cigarette tins in No 4; solid bags of cement in No 5.
ref. used 
 HSAC

Lettens Jan04/04/2013

UK hydro member
ref. used 
 UK Hydrographic Office

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  copyright: Racey Carl   
 
  copyright: Racey Carl copyright: Racey Carl  
 
 copyright: Unknown - onbekend - inconnu copyright: UK Hydrographic Office copyright: Unknown - onbekend - inconnu  
 
 
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  Hydrographic Service UK  
   
  History  
 
Racey Carl23/12/2010The S.S. “BREDA” This single screw cargo steamer was built at Schiedam in 1921 for the Royal Netherlands steamship Co. She was 402 feet long, with a beam of 58 feet, loaded draft was 38 feet and the gross tonnage was 6941. Her large cargo capacity made her a useful member of the fleet and served her owners successfully until 1940. Following the fall of the Netherlands to the advancing Germans, the BREDA reached the UK and she was put under the control of P & O to assist with the war effort.

She was painted an overall drab grey and armed with a solitary 4.7 inch (‘Woolworth’) gun on the poop. On 23 December 1940 she was at anchor off Lismore. She had loaded a mixed cargo in London and come to join other vessels to sail in a convoy; she was bound for Mombasa, Karachi and Bombay. During t he evening, agroup of Heinkel III bombers were spotted by the Royal Observer Corps on the Easdale Island, heading north towards Oban, and, although the alarm was raised, the convoy could not be warned in time. The ship was not actually hit but acouple of bombs just missed and an important seawater intake pipe was fracturedand she began to take water; within 15 minutes, Captain Fooy ordered the boa ts lowered....

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  obanmuseum.org.uk
Lettens Jan23/12/2010Breda SS, a 6.941 ton single-funnel Dutch steamer, built in Holland, 1921. 418ftx58ft. Armed: 4.7in on stern. 3.000 tons cement, 175 tons tobacco and cigarettes, three Hawker biplanes, 30 De Havilland Tiger Moths, spare parts for the aircraft, Army lorries and spares, NAAFI crockery, copper ingots, rubber-soled sandals, 10 horses and nine dogs, London for Bombay.

Sunk: 23 December, 1940, by near-misses from German Heinkel 111 bomber. Bombs broke piping in engine room and ship flooded. Taken in tow and beached in Ardmucknish Bay. Little salvage before Breda slipped into deep water.
ref. used 
 HSAC
Lettens Jan04/04/2013UK hydro member
ref. used 
 UK Hydrographic Office


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  History  
 
Racey Carl23/12/2010The S.S. “BREDA” This single screw cargo steamer was built at Schiedam in 1921 for the Royal Netherlands steamship Co. She was 402 feet long, with a beam of 58 feet, loaded draft was 38 feet and the gross tonnage was 6941. Her large cargo capacity made her a useful member of the fleet and served her owners successfully until 1940. Following the fall of the Netherlands to the advancing Germans, the BREDA reached the UK and she was put under the control of P & O to assist with the war effort.

She was painted an overall drab grey and armed with a solitary 4.7 inch (‘Woolworth’) gun on the poop. On 23 December 1940 she was at anchor off Lismore. She had loaded a mixed cargo in London and come to join other vessels to sail in a convoy; she was bound for Mombasa, Karachi and Bombay. During t he evening, agroup of Heinkel III bombers were spotted by the Royal Observer Corps on the Easdale Island, heading north towards Oban, and, although the alarm was raised, the convoy could not be warned in time. The ship was not actually hit but acouple of bombs just missed and an important seawater intake pipe was fracturedand she began to take water; within 15 minutes, Captain Fooy ordered the boa ts lowered.

An Admiralty tug came alongside and helped to run the ship aground ona 3 fathom shoal just off Rubha Garbh-aird Point. The 10 horses being carried in boxes as deck cargo were released to swim ashore. It was decided that the ship and cargo could be salvagedand some of the cargo was recovered during Christmas Eve. However, a storm hit the coast during the operation and the ship was drive n forward off the shoal and in to deeper water, were she sank. Although her funnel and masts remained above water for many years, she seems to have largely forgotten. The Royal Navy were asked by the Northern Lighthouse Board to sweep the wreck to 28 feet as she was a hazard to shipping. Since 1986, the wreck has become a popular site for sub-aqua divers.
ref. used 
  obanmuseum.org.uk
 
 
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SS Breda [+1940]
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