british British Royal Navy - Admiralty - RN HMS Warrior II [+1940]
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general
nationality british
purpose war
type yacht
propulsion steam
date built 1904
status
live live
details
weight (tons) 1120  grt
dimensions 87 x 10 x 5.18 m
material steel
engine 2 x 4 cyl. triple expansion engine, , dual shaft, 2 screws
power 314  n.h.p.
speed 15  knots
yard no. 121
about the loss
cause lost air raid
date lost 11/07/1940  [dd/mm/yyyy]
casualties  max.1rank: 666
about people
builder
Ailsa Shipbuilding Co. Ltd., Troon (Scotland)
engine by
Inglis A. & J. Ltd., Glasgow
last owner
[1]British Royal Navy - Admiralty - RN, London
HMS Warrior II [+1940]
period 1939 ~ 1940
prev. owners
[2]Rex Hoyes, Southampton
SS Warrior
period 1937 ~ 1939
[3]De La Sota Ramón - Marques De Llano - Sociedad Euskalerria, Bilbao
SS Goizeko Izarro
period 1920 ~ 1937
[4]Cochran Alexander S., Southampton
SS Warrior
period 1915 ~ 1920
[5]Vanderbilt Alfred G., Southampton
SS Wayfarer
period 1915 ~ 1915
[6]Vanderbilt Frederick W., New York
SS Warrior
period 1904 ~ 1915
IMO/Off. no.: 115052
captain
about the wreck
depth (m.) 55 max. / -- min. (m)
orientation
protected
war grave
references
references
[1] Stuart Cameron, clydesite.co.uk
[2] Miramar Ship Index
updates
entered by Eekelers Dirk
entered 25/01/2006
last update Henly Candy
last update 13/06/2013
 
  Position  
 
Lettens Jan01/10/2009
latitudeUK hydro member
longitudeUK hydro member
AISUK hydro member
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dist. homeportdist. homeport
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 UK Hydrographic Office
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  The Wreck today  
 

Lettens Jan01/10/2009

UK hydro member
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 UK Hydrographic Office

Chipchase Nick14/06/2010

Very little of Warriors lightly built hull remains. The bow section is still intact and lies on its port side. There is an anchor here and her gun both on the port side. Well exposed are her two boilers fitted fore and aft to ensure a narrow hull design. Her twin engines are side by side behind. There is a debris pile between the boilers and engines. There is a large letter W on each engine. None of the engraved oil boxes now remain. Very little of the stern remains. Most of her " letter box " portholes are gone. These were a special design to ventilate the ship in the tropics. One, very much in situ, can be seen inside the bow. The wreck lies on shingle and pebbles at 54 metres.
ref. used 
 Chipchase Nick, Personal dive log, Chipchase N.

Chipchase Nick03/09/2011

  • Although not considered to be a difficult wreck dive two of the UK's best known diving characters have died here. Harry Railing died in 1999 of an uncontrolled rapid ascent and in 2011 my long term diving partner Alan Dunster ( " Uncle Al " ) failed to surface from the wreck. Alan loved this wreck and its history and had dived it many times. Both are sadly missed by the diving community a nd serve as a reminder to divers that all dives have inherent dangers.
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 Chipchase Nick

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  Hydrographic Service UK  
   
  History  
 
Eekelers Dirk25/01/2006The Warrior was 284 ft long, a beam of 32 ft and a draught of 17 ft. She was commissioned by Frederick Vanderbilt, a wealthy man who made his money from financing and constructing the New York railroad. No expense was spared on her fittings and few vessels could match her ´splendid´ decor. She was launched on the 4th February 1904 at the Ailsa Shipyard, Troon. She was damaged in a storm off Columb ia where her rudder was broken, her propellers bent and her hull was damaged.

She was refloated, towed to New York and completely refitted and then sold. She was renamed the Wayfarer, re-sold a year later and was then requisitioned for the 1st World War. After the war, she was overhauled, sold, and then sold again a couple of years later to a Spanish shipping magnate - Ramon de la Sota from Bilboa , who renamed her the Goizeko Izarro (Basque for Morning Star). She was used as a hospital ship during the Spanish Civil War. When Ramon de la Sota died in 1936, she was put up for sale, sold to Sir Hugo Cunliffe-Owen, brought back to the British Isles and re-christened Warrior. On the outbreak of the second World War, she was requisitioned by the Royal Navy and as they already had a vessel called Warrior, she was renamed Warrior II....

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Lettens Jan04/04/2013UK hydro member
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 UK Hydrographic Office


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About Owners
 
British Royal Navy - Admiralty - RN, London

In 1509 when Henry VIII was crowned he realised the growing navel power of King James IV of Scots. James had built an impressive fleet to control the Western Isles and was allied to France. Henry built up of his own fleet, the Navy Royal, as it was then known. New ships were constructed, the best known being the Mary Rose. Smaller types of warships (galleases) combining the best features of oars, sails and guns were also built. By Henry's death in 1547 his fleet had grown to 58 vessels.

In 1546 a 'Council of the Marine' was established which later became the 'Navy Board'. The Navy Board was in charge of the daily administration of the navy until 1832 when it was combined with the Board of the Admiralty.

Elizabeth I inherited a fleet of only 27 ships in 1558. Instead of building up her own fleet Elizabeth encouraged private enterprise against Spain's new empire. Men like Sir John Hawkins and Sir Francis Drake to command groups of Royal and private ships to attack the Spanish. When Spain threatened invasion with its Armada in 1588 the Navy of England both Royal and private defended the realm.

Early in the Seventeenth Century, larger galleons were built with heavier armaments. the largest English ship was Sovereign of the Seas built for prestige purposes by Charles I in 1637. The first ship with three gun decks to carry her 102 guns, she was the most powerful ship in the world for many years.

When King Charles II came to the throne in 1660 he inherited a huge fleet of 154 ships. This was a permanent professional national force and the beginning of the Royal Navy as we know it today.

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  History  
 
Eekelers Dirk25/01/2006The Warrior was 284 ft long, a beam of 32 ft and a draught of 17 ft. She was commissioned by Frederick Vanderbilt, a wealthy man who made his money from financing and constructing the New York railroad. No expense was spared on her fittings and few vessels could match her ´splendid´ decor. She was launched on the 4th February 1904 at the Ailsa Shipyard, Troon. She was damaged in a storm off Columb ia where her rudder was broken, her propellers bent and her hull was damaged.

She was refloated, towed to New York and completely refitted and then sold. She was renamed the Wayfarer, re-sold a year later and was then requisitioned for the 1st World War. After the war, she was overhauled, sold, and then sold again a couple of years later to a Spanish shipping magnate - Ramon de la Sota from Bilboa , who renamed her the Goizeko Izarro (Basque for Morning Star). She was used as a hospital ship during the Spanish Civil War. When Ramon de la Sota died in 1936, she was put up for sale, sold to Sir Hugo Cunliffe-Owen, brought back to the British Isles and re-christened Warrior. On the outbreak of the second World War, she was requisitioned by the Royal Navy and as they already had a vessel called Warrior, she was renamed Warrior II.

She was stripped of her luxurious fittings, which were put into storage and fitted with a Lewis Gun and depth charges to protect her from enemy action and given the role of escorting British submarines through the English Channel between Portsmouth and Portland. She was returning to Portsmouth on the 11th July 1940 when she was spotted by German aircraft and w as a sitting target. She was attacked by over 50 German aircraft which attacked her in two waves. Bombs were dropped all around her from the first wave, which she fought off bravely, but received a bomb from the second wave straight through the decks. The ship was abandoned and the only casualty was the chief steward whose had been in the ward room where the bomb landed.
 
 
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HMS Warrior II [+1940]
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