british British Royal Navy - Admiralty - RN HMS Victory (+1744)
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  Details  
 
general
nationality british
purpose war
type Ship of the Line
subtype/class 1st rate Ship of the Line
propulsion sailing ship
date built 1737
status
unknown
details
weight (tons) 1921  bm
dimensions 53.2 x 15.4 x -- m
material wood
rigging 3 masts
armament 100 to 110 Bronze cannons
speed  
about the loss
cause lost gale/storm
date lost 05/10/1744  [dd/mm/yyyy]
about people
builder
British Royal Navy - Admiralty - RN, London
owner
British Royal Navy - Admiralty - RN, London
captain Admiral Sir John Balchin
about the wreck
depth (m.) 80 max. / 70 min. (m)
orientation
protected
war grave
updates
entered by Lettens Jan
entered 01/07/2002
last update Allen Tony
last update 23/03/2010
 
  Position  
 
[1] Wrexplore04/04/2011
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 Wrexplore
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  The Wreck today  
 
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  copyright: Monamy, Peter copyright: Unknown - onbekend - inconnu copyright: National Maritime Museum (UK) , nmm.ac.uk 
 
 copyright: Odyssey Marine copyright: Unknown - onbekend - inconnu copyright: UK Hydrographic Office copyright: Unknown - onbekend - inconnu 
 
 copyright: Unknown - onbekend - inconnu copyright: Unknown - onbekend - inconnu copyright: Unknown - onbekend - inconnu  
 
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  History  
 
Lettens Jan25/08/2010HMS VICTORY; 100 cannons; Built in 1737, Portsmouth. Wrecked in 1744.
  • 1740 On Monday 14th. July Sir John NORRIS sailed from St. Helens with his squadron of 20 Men of War. On Thursday 17th. they were back, having the night before met with disaster off Portland by the LYON Man of War running foul of the VICTORY, and carrying away her Head, and doing other damage; the LYON lost her bowsprit and 28 men who were thrown over by the shock. The sea poured into VICTORY until Sir John gave orders to stop it. The Admiral moved his flag to BOYNE on the 23rd. and sailed again with his fleet.
  • 1744 Capt. Samuel FAULKNER, flagship of Adm. Sir John BALCHEN, who was taken from his post as Governor of Greenwich Hospital to command a reinforced Channel fleet of 14 ships of the line which was being sent to relieve an important convoy of storeships for Adm. MATTHEWS in the Mediterranean, but which had been blockaded in the Tagus since July by a powerful French squadron. On board VICTORY were more than 1000 officers and men, including 100 young midshipmen, from Britain´s noblest families who were being sent to sea for the first time.
    He sailed from Spithead in the first week in August, accompanied by a Dutch squadron of nine men of war, drove off the French Admiral de Rochambeau and saw the convoy well on its way to the Straits.
  • On 1st. October, when the fleet returned to the mouth of the Channel, they were hit by a series of heavy gales driving up from the South West. All the ships but VICTORY made it back to Portsmouth, most in a terribly shattered condition, but of VICTORY there was no trace.
  • On the 19th. October the FALKLAND. Capt. GRENVILLE, and the FLY sloop, Capt. LLOYD, which had been sent to cruise round Guernsey and Alderney to gain intelligence, found several pieces of a wreck and part of a carved-work stern. They were told by the people of Alderney of the firing of near 100 guns between the 4th. and the 5th.
ref. used 
 Phillips Michael, History Of The Royal Navy During The Napoleontic Era
Lettens Jan04/03/2008HMS VICTORY; 1st Rate; 100 cannons; 1.912 bm; 174.5x50.5 ft; Rebuilt in 1737 from the remains of Royal James. Portsmouth. She was wrecked on the Casquets on 5th October 1744.
ref. used 
 Colledge & Warlow, Ships of the Royal Navy
Lettens Jan06/08/2007Lost in a storm as flagship of a squadron under Sir John Balchen, Admiral of the White, and Captain Samuel Faulkner, returning from an action off Portugal. All were lost, around 1100 in total.

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About Owners
 
British Royal Navy - Admiralty - RN, London

In 1509 when Henry VIII was crowned he realised the growing navel power of King James IV of Scots. James had built an impressive fleet to control the Western Isles and was allied to France. Henry built up of his own fleet, the Navy Royal, as it was then known. New ships were constructed, the best known being the Mary Rose. Smaller types of warships (galleases) combining the best features of oars, sails and guns were also built. By Henry's death in 1547 his fleet had grown to 58 vessels.

In 1546 a 'Council of the Marine' was established which later became the 'Navy Board'. The Navy Board was in charge of the daily administration of the navy until 1832 when it was combined with the Board of the Admiralty.

Elizabeth I inherited a fleet of only 27 ships in 1558. Instead of building up her own fleet Elizabeth encouraged private enterprise against Spain's new empire. Men like Sir John Hawkins and Sir Francis Drake to command groups of Royal and private ships to attack the Spanish. When Spain threatened invasion with its Armada in 1588 the Navy of England both Royal and private defended the realm.

Early in the Seventeenth Century, larger galleons were built with heavier armaments. the largest English ship was Sovereign of the Seas built for prestige purposes by Charles I in 1637. The first ship with three gun decks to carry her 102 guns, she was the most powerful ship in the world for many years.

When King Charles II came to the throne in 1660 he inherited a huge fleet of 154 ships. This was a permanent professional national force and the beginning of the Royal Navy as we know it today.

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About Builders
 British Royal Navy - Admiralty - RN, London
In 1509 when Henry VIII was crowned he realised the growing navel power of King James IV of Scots. James had built an impressive fleet to control the Western Isles and was allied to France. Henry built up of his own fleet, the Navy Royal, as it was then known. New ships were constructed, the best known being the Mary Rose. Smaller types of warships (galleases) combining the best features of oars, sails and guns were also built. By Henry's death in 1547 his fleet had grown to 58 vessels.

In 1546 a 'Council of the Marine' was established which later became the 'Navy Board'. The Navy Board was in charge of the daily administration of the navy until 1832 when it was combined with the Board of the Admiralty.

Elizabeth I inherited a fleet of only 27 ships in 1558. Instead of building up her own fleet Elizabeth encouraged private enterprise against Spain's new empire. Men like Sir John Hawkins and Sir Francis Drake to command groups of Royal and private ships to attack the Spanish. When Spain threatened invasion with its Armada in 1588 the Navy of England both Royal and private defended the realm.

Early in the Seventeenth Century, larger galleons were built with heavier armaments. the largest English ship was Sovereign of the Seas built for prestige purposes by Charles I in 1637. The first ship with three gun decks to carry her 102 guns, she was the most powerful ship in the world for many years.

When King Charles II came to the throne in 1660 he inherited a huge fleet of 154 ships. This was a permanent professional national force and the beginning of the Royal Navy as we know it today.

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