british British Royal Navy - Admiralty - RN HMS Oxley (+1939)
report an error
       
  Details  
 
general
nationality british
purpose war
type submarine
subtype/class Oxley class submarine (br.)
propulsion diesel and batteries
date built 1925
status
unknown
details
weight (tons) 1420  disp (subm)
dimensions 83.8 x 8.38 x 4.8 m
material steel
engine 2 × diesel engines, 4,600 hp, 2 × electric motors, 350 hp, twin screws
armament 16 torpedoes, 8 × 21"/533 mm T.T. (6 fwd, 2 aft), 1 × QF 4-inch (101.6 mm) Mk XII deck gun, 2 × Lewis A.A.
power 9200  h.p.
speed knots
about the loss
cause lost torpedo
date lost 10/09/1939  [dd/mm/yyyy]
casualties  max.52rank: 586
about people
builder
Vickers-Armstrong Ltd., Barrow-In-Furness
owner
British Royal Navy - Admiralty - RN, London
captain
complement 54
about the wreck
depth (m.)
orientation
protected
war grave
updates
entered by Lettens Jan
entered 01/07/2002
last update Lettens Jan
last update 05/12/2009
 
  Position  
 
Claes Johnny28/11/2007
latitudehydro member
longitudehydro member
AIShydro member
mark add position to my marks (+/-5miles)
dist. homeportdist. homeport
position disp.
show neighbour. wrecks members only
insert new position
 
  The Wreck today  
 
insert wreck site info
 
  Movies  
  insert new movie  
 
  Pictures  
 
copyright: Unknown - onbekend - inconnu
 
 copyright: Unknown - onbekend - inconnu copyright: Unknown - onbekend - inconnu copyright: Sammlung Bernt Schultz  
 
 copyright: Unknown - onbekend - inconnu copyright: Unknown - onbekend - inconnu   
 
insert new picture
 
  History  
 
Claes Johnny28/11/2007HMS Oxley sunk off Obrestad, Norwegian coast, south of Stavanger - torpedoed in error by HMS Triton.

Submarines Oxley and Triton were patrolling off Norway and had been in regular contact when Triton spotted an unidentified submarine off the coast of Norway.

Believing it might be Oxley a number of signals of recognition were flashed by Triton.

No reply was forthcoming and after several challenges Triton fired two torpedoes that struck the submarine and sent her to the seabed.

Triton closed in on the area and found three survivors. A Board of Enquiry found that Oxley was some way out of position and that Triton had acted correctly and was not culpable for the sinking
ref. used 
  submariners.co.uk
Landers Joe09/10/2004This submarine was not only the first RN warship to be lost in the war which had begun only a week before, but was a victim of ´friendly fire´.

She had strayed into the patrol area, in the Norwegian Sea, off Obrestad, of another RN submarine, Triton, which was travelling on the surface.

Triton challenged the submarine she had sighted three times, the first two were by signal lamp, but no signal was returned, and she accordingly attacked.

There were only two survivors. Blame lay with the lookouts and the Officer of the Watch on Oxley who didn´t call their Co to the bridge until the third challenge was seen.

This was a rifle grenade, but it was too late and nothing could be done. The CO of Triton was cleared of any blame.

insert new history
 
  Documents  
 
Landers Joe09/10/2004[EN]

List of the Oxley Crew

My grandad, Leading Telegraphist E. W. LANDERS was on board.
copyrights
 Liverpool Daily Post


insert new document
 
About Owners
 
British Royal Navy - Admiralty - RN, London

In 1509 when Henry VIII was crowned he realised the growing navel power of King James IV of Scots. James had built an impressive fleet to control the Western Isles and was allied to France. Henry built up of his own fleet, the Navy Royal, as it was then known. New ships were constructed, the best known being the Mary Rose. Smaller types of warships (galleases) combining the best features of oars, sails and guns were also built. By Henry's death in 1547 his fleet had grown to 58 vessels.

In 1546 a 'Council of the Marine' was established which later became the 'Navy Board'. The Navy Board was in charge of the daily administration of the navy until 1832 when it was combined with the Board of the Admiralty.

Elizabeth I inherited a fleet of only 27 ships in 1558. Instead of building up her own fleet Elizabeth encouraged private enterprise against Spain's new empire. Men like Sir John Hawkins and Sir Francis Drake to command groups of Royal and private ships to attack the Spanish. When Spain threatened invasion with its Armada in 1588 the Navy of England both Royal and private defended the realm.

Early in the Seventeenth Century, larger galleons were built with heavier armaments. the largest English ship was Sovereign of the Seas built for prestige purposes by Charles I in 1637. The first ship with three gun decks to carry her 102 guns, she was the most powerful ship in the world for many years.

When King Charles II came to the throne in 1660 he inherited a huge fleet of 154 ships. This was a permanent professional national force and the beginning of the Royal Navy as we know it today.

read more
 
About Builders
 Vickers-Armstrong Ltd., Barrow-In-Furness
Vickers-Armstrongs (Shipbuilders) Ltd
 
 
Western Europe
pref. Google
 
 
WRECKS: DISABLED zoom out zoom in view full chart
chart
HMS Oxley (+1939)
Western Europe
More charts
Western Europe North Atlantic Ocean - Northern Part North Atlantic Ocean - Eastern Part Arctic region The World
 
 
  Update statistics  
 
  Advertisement  
 
advertise
 
   
  search  
 
You may consider access to
search wreck
show prev. names
A-Z search
 
search chart:
chart catalogue
 
search owner/builder: