british South Eastern & Chatham Railway Co. SS The Queen [+1916]
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  Details  
 
general
nationality british
purpose transport
type cargo ship
propulsion steam turbine
date built 1903
status
live live
details
weight (tons) 1676  grt
dimensions 94.2 x 12.2 x -- m
engine Two steam turbines, three shafts, triple screw
power 800  n.h.p.
speed 21  knots
yard no. 682
IMO/Off. no. 118293
about the loss
cause lost torpedo
date lost 26/10/1916  [dd/mm/yyyy]
casualties 0
about people
builder
Denny W. & Bros. Ltd., Dumbarton
engine by
Parsons Marine Steam Turbine Co., Wallsend
owner
South Eastern & Chatham Railway Co., London
captain
about the wreck
depth (m.) 30 max. / -- min. (m)
orientation
protected
war grave
updates
entered by Jan Lettens
entered 01/07/2002
last update Jan Lettens
last update 04/04/2014
 
  Position  
 
Jan Lettens01/10/2009
latitudeUK hydro member
longitudeUK hydro member
AISUK hydro member
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dist. homeportdist. homeport
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 UK Hydrographic Office
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  The Wreck today  
 

Ryckewaert Caroline01/01/2008

The Queen was built in 1903 at the William Denny Brothers yard, Dunbarton. She went into service for the SE&C Railway Co. on the Folkestone to Calais route. She was the first steamer on the cross-channel run to be fitted with the new turbine engines. She was fast and comfortable, and could cross the Channel in less than 1 hour and during WW1 was used to move troops from the UK to France. She was returning from Boulogne to Folkstone with just mail on-board on the night of the 26 October 1916 (Troops were not carried at night) when she got in the middle of a raid by German Destroyers on the Dover Patrol.

The raid had already resulted in the sinking of the old Destroyer HMS Flirt and 7 Drifters patrolling the Barrage, when the Germans came across The Queen. Her crew were ordered to abandon ship and then the Germans sunk her by either torpedo or by placing charges in her, with no loss of life The Queen is upright and quite intact in a max depth of 30m. She is quite settled into the seabed with a row of empty portholes above this. The cabins on her deck are still intact and can be looked into. There is a large bank of sand off to the north of her but the south side is very clear.There is a lot of damage and a large hole at the stern end and you can penetrate into the engine room area around here.

twee maal op gedoken viz was 20 meter Heel veel leven, oa hondshaai...op patrijspoort :-)

Jan Lettens01/10/2009

UK hydro member
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  Hydrographic Service UK  
   
  History  
 
Allen Tony08/05/2008

The Queen was a 1,676grt British Merchant ship built by William Denny & Brothers of Dumbarton for the South Eastern & Chatham Railway Co. London. She was powered by 2 x Turbines, triple screw, 800nhp 21kn built by Parsons Marine Steam Turbine Co, Newcastle. She was the first turbine Channel steamer and her maiden voyage from Folkestone to Calais took placed on 27th June 1903. She acted as troopship in WW1 and rescued 2500 refugees from the AMIRAL GANTEAUME on 26th October 1914. On the 26th August 1916 when 3 miles NE from Varne Light Vessel, English Channel she was captured by German destroyer V.80, torpedoed and sunk by destroyer S.60. Vessel was owned by South Eastern & Chatham Railway Co, London.

ref. used: 
[1] His Majesty'S Stationary Office, British Merchant Shipping (Losses) WW1
[2] Stuart Cameron, clydesite.co.uk
Jan Lettens01/10/2009UK hydro member
ref. used: 
 UK Hydrographic Office


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About Builders
 Denny W. & Bros. Ltd., Dumbarton
Very famous builder from Dumbarton, established in 1840. Closed down in 1960. The elephant is symbol for the company's strength.
 
 
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Met de Ephyra maakt onze vriendengroep duiktrips op de Noordzee. Gepassioneerd zoeken en onderzoeken we de talloze wrakken in de Franse, Britse, Nederlandse en uiteraard ook de Belgische wateren. Info: Jan en Wim Vermeire Donklaan 26 9290 Berlare Tel: +32 (0)9 367 01 20
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Gepassioneerd zoeken en onderzoeken we de talloze wrakken in de Franse, Britse, Nederlandse en uiteraard ook de Belgische wateren.

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