british British Royal Navy - Admiralty - RN HMSM Affray (P421) [+1951]
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  Details  
 
general
nationality british
purpose war
type submarine
propulsion diesel and batteries
date built 1944
status
live live
details
weight (tons) 1385  disp (surf)
dimensions 85.65 x 6.71 x 5.18 m
material steel
engine Diesel-electric, 4,300 hp surfaced, 1,250 hp submerged
power 4300  h.p.
speed 18.5  knots
about the loss
cause lost foundered
date lost 16/04/1951  [dd/mm/yyyy]
casualties  max.75rank: 562
about people
builder
Cammell Laird & Co., Birkenhead
owner
British Royal Navy - Admiralty - RN, London
captain
about the wreck
depth (m.) 86 max. / -- min. (m)
orientation
protected yes
war grave
updates
entered by Lettens Jan
entered 01/07/2002
last update Allen Tony
last update 04/10/2011
 
  Position  
 
[1] Lettens Jan27/08/2008
latitudeUK hydro member
longitudeUK hydro member
AISUK hydro member
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dist. homeportdist. homeport
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 UK Hydrographic Office
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  The Wreck today  
 

Lettens Jan06/08/2007

Protection of Miltary Remains Act 1986. 400 metre exclusion zone. Protected Wreck Site

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  Pictures  
 
copyright: Unknown - onbekend - inconnu
 
 copyright: Unknown - onbekend - inconnu copyright: UK Hydrographic Office copyright: Unknown - onbekend - inconnu copyright: Unknown - onbekend - inconnu 
 
 copyright: Unknown - onbekend - inconnu    
 
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  Hydrographic Service UK  
   
  History  
 
Claes Johnny29/11/2007HMS Affray left Portsmouth to take part in Exercise Training Spring with a training class of young officers aboard, her orders being to make a daily report between 9am and 10am each morning and to land a party of Royal Marines on any suitable beach in the patrol area during the night. On the morning of the 17th Affray failed to report her position as required and rescue vessels were immediately put on alert as repeated attempts to call up the submarine failed.

It was known that she had intended to dive 30 miles south of the Isle of Wight, so the search was concentrated off the island but the exact position of Affray was unknown. A number of vessels involved in the search reported faint Asdic signals and the submarine Ambush decoded a message stating, WE ARE TRAPPED ON THE BOTTOM but the Affray still could not be found. On the evening of the 19th the Admiralty regretfully called off the search. While the search for survivors was now fruitless the search for the Affray was to continue. In the middle of June, after nine weeks of searching, an underwater camera focused on the submarine´s nameplate. Her final position proved to be 37 miles from her known diving position. She was lying on an even keel on the edge of a series of underwater chasms known as Hurd’s Deep in the English Channel....

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Lettens Jan27/08/2008UK hydro member
ref. used 
 UK Hydrographic Office
Allen Tony26/06/2007[Other Source:] Royal Navy Submarine, lost in English Channel, lying in 330 feet. The exact cause has not been established beyond doubt but the snorkel mast was found to have broken off. Further salvage operations had to be were abandoned as the safety of the salvers could not be guaranteed. Failed to surface after a training exercise. Crew of 75 lost. A Class submarine built 12 Apr 1945.

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  Documents  
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About Owners
 
British Royal Navy - Admiralty - RN, London

In 1509 when Henry VIII was crowned he realised the growing navel power of King James IV of Scots. James had built an impressive fleet to control the Western Isles and was allied to France. Henry built up of his own fleet, the Navy Royal, as it was then known. New ships were constructed, the best known being the Mary Rose. Smaller types of warships (galleases) combining the best features of oars, sails and guns were also built. By Henry's death in 1547 his fleet had grown to 58 vessels.

In 1546 a 'Council of the Marine' was established which later became the 'Navy Board'. The Navy Board was in charge of the daily administration of the navy until 1832 when it was combined with the Board of the Admiralty.

Elizabeth I inherited a fleet of only 27 ships in 1558. Instead of building up her own fleet Elizabeth encouraged private enterprise against Spain's new empire. Men like Sir John Hawkins and Sir Francis Drake to command groups of Royal and private ships to attack the Spanish. When Spain threatened invasion with its Armada in 1588 the Navy of England both Royal and private defended the realm.

Early in the Seventeenth Century, larger galleons were built with heavier armaments. the largest English ship was Sovereign of the Seas built for prestige purposes by Charles I in 1637. The first ship with three gun decks to carry her 102 guns, she was the most powerful ship in the world for many years.

When King Charles II came to the throne in 1660 he inherited a huge fleet of 154 ships. This was a permanent professional national force and the beginning of the Royal Navy as we know it today.

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About Builders
 Cammell Laird & Co., Birkenhead
Charles Cammell and Co, iron and steel founders, was established in 1824. Cammell, Laird and Co. was formed in 1903 when the Laird Brothers amalgamated their company with Charles Cammell and Co. - - The Cammell Laird site at Birkenhead on Merseyside was established in 1824, and has been successfully building, repairing ships right through to present times. The shipyard is in a world famous maritime region and is recognised internationally as having been at the forefront of the British Shipbuilding Industry. - - - - - - - Cammell Laird used to have their own flag. The flag was used on ships that were in their trials. Only when approved by the buyer, she changed flags

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  History  
 
Claes Johnny29/11/2007HMS Affray left Portsmouth to take part in Exercise Training Spring with a training class of young officers aboard, her orders being to make a daily report between 9am and 10am each morning and to land a party of Royal Marines on any suitable beach in the patrol area during the night. On the morning of the 17th Affray failed to report her position as required and rescue vessels were immediately put on alert as repeated attempts to call up the submarine failed.

It was known that she had intended to dive 30 miles south of the Isle of Wight, so the search was concentrated off the island but the exact position of Affray was unknown. A number of vessels involved in the search reported faint Asdic signals and the submarine Ambush decoded a message stating, WE ARE TRAPPED ON THE BOTTOM but the Affray still could not be found. On the evening of the 19th the Admiralty regretfully called off the search. While the search for survivors was now fruitless the search for the Affray was to continue. In the middle of June, after nine weeks of searching, an underwater camera focused on the submarine´s nameplate. Her final position proved to be 37 miles from her known diving position. She was lying on an even keel on the edge of a series of underwater chasms known as Hurd’s Deep in the English Channel.

Divers could find no evidence of collision damage but noted that her radar aerial and periscope were raised, indicating that she must have been submerged when she foundered. Both hydroplanes were in the rise position indicating that attempts to raise the submarine must have been in op eration before being finally defeated by the incoming water. A reason for the disaster was however soon found when the snort mast was examined. A clean break was discovered 3 feet above the deck leading to the conclusion that metal fatigue had caused the loss, allowing water into the boat through a 10-inch hole. This was confirmed by tests carried out on the recovered mast at Portsmouth, all assertions as to a collision being quashed.

Exactly what caused the snorkel to shear at the time it did will in all likelihood never be known. Click to read more
 
 
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HMSM Affray (P421) [+1951]
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