american Alaska Steamship Co. MV Diamond Knot (+1947)
report an error
       
  Details  
 
general
nationality american
purpose transport
type cargo ship
propulsion
date built 1944
status
live live
details
weight (tons) 5525  grt
dimensions 99.4 x 15.2 x 6.4 m
material steel
engine Diesel , single shaft, 1 screw
power 1750  h.p.
speed 11  knots
about the loss
cause lost collision
date lost 13/08/1947  [dd/mm/yyyy]
about people
builder
Consolidated Steel Corp. (Wilmington Ca. & Orange Tx), Orange (Texas)
owner
Alaska Steamship Co., Seattle
captain C. N. Goodwin
complement 79
about the wreck
status in good state
depth (m.)
orientation
position on seabed to starboard
visibility good
current strong
sea bed sand and gravel
marine life abundant
protected
war grave
references
references
  boydski.com
updates
entered by Lettens Jan
entered 02/02/2008
last update Gothro Phil
last update 17/03/2011
 
  Position  
 
Lettens Jan02/02/2008
latitudehydro member
longitudehydro member
AIShydro member
mark add position to my marks (+/-5miles)
dist. homeportdist. homeport
ref. used
 NOAA Office of Coast Survey, nauticalcharts.noa..
position disp.
show neighbour. wrecks members only
insert new position
 
  The Wreck today  
 

Lettens Jan02/02/2008

hydro member
ref. used 
 NOAA Office of Coast Survey, nauticalcharts.noa..

Gothro Phil17/03/2011

For divers, the nutrient rich currents can be tricky, but oh so rewarding when you time the tides and weather right and drop down the line to the Knot. Every square inch of her massive structure is covered with huge billowy white Metridium Anemones. Warbonnets and Wolf eels slither across the decks and companionways in search of their next meal. Huge schools of Black and Yellowtail rockfish duck o ut of the current behind bits of the wreckage, along with an occasional Canary or colorful China rockfish.

The back section of the wreck is most often visited by divers and is the shallower section of the ship, which lies on its starboard side. The wheelhouse, lifeboat winches and much of the aft deck structure are still in place and are covered with colorful sponges and spectacular marine growth. The forward section of the shipwreck is rarely visited, but just as rewarding. Large wolf eels and octopus are found throughout the wreckage along with many colorful grunt sculpins and gunnels
ref. used 
  boydski.com

insert wreck site info
 
  Movies  
  insert new movie  
 
  Pictures  
 
 
   copyright: Unknown - onbekend - inconnu copyright: Unknown - onbekend - inconnu 
 
 copyright: Unknown - onbekend - inconnu    
 
insert new picture
 
  History  
 
Gothro Phil17/03/2011The Diamond Knot was a C1-M-AV1 subtype, or general cargo ship. These ships were shorter, narrower, and had less draft than the earlier C1 designs, and were rated at only 11 knots (20 km/h). The USS Alamosa is an example of a C1-M ship. These ships were either fitted with one large diesel engine or a steam turbine engine. The diesel was the most numerous. About 215 of this type were built in ten different shipyards. Consolidated Steel Corp., Ltd. of Wilmington, California built the largest number — about a quarter of all built. These ships were either named for knots, such as SS Emerald Knot or with a two-word name beginning with "Coastal", such as SS Coastal Ranger. About 65 of this subtype were complete for the US Navy. Those ships were generally named after counties in the U.S. the remainder stayed with the United States Maritime Commission (MARCOM) with a few exceptions....

read more
ref. used 
[1]  boydski.com
[2]  en.wikipedia.org


insert new history
 
  Documents  
  insert new document  
About Builders
 Consolidated Steel Corp. (Wilmington Ca. & Orange Tx), Orange (Texas)
Consolidated Steel Corporation was formed in 1929 from the amalgamation of Llewellyn Iron Works, Baker Iron Works and Union Iron Works. It started its shipbuilding operation at a leased shipyard in Long Beach, which was the former Craig Shipbuilding, but built a wholly new shipyard in Wilmington in 1941, with four ways, in the second wave of shipbuilding expansion, with $13mm invested by the USMC. Four more ways were added in the third wave of shipbuilding expansion and, at its peak, the Wilmington shipyard employed 12,000 people. Both shipyards were fed with prefabricated steel and sub-assemblies from the company's main plant in Mayfield. After the war the two shipyards were liquidated. The Long Beach yard was in Channel Three of the Inner Harbor, although it's not clear exactly where. The Wilmington yard was where the Port of Los Angeles' TraPac container terminal is now.

Consolidated Steel Corporation of Texas a subsidiary of the Los Angeles-based company. The shipyard in Orange was a small fabrication yard in 1940, when the Navy contracted to expand it into a yard capable of building surface combatants. At its peak, the yard employed 20,000 people, more than live in Orange even today. After the war the yard reverted to being a fabricator and was for many years a division of U.S. Steel. It is now a shipyard again, as a division of Signal International.

read more
 
 
  History  
 
Gothro Phil17/03/2011The Diamond Knot was a C1-M-AV1 subtype, or general cargo ship. These ships were shorter, narrower, and had less draft than the earlier C1 designs, and were rated at only 11 knots (20 km/h). The USS Alamosa is an example of a C1-M ship. These ships were either fitted with one large diesel engine or a steam turbine engine. The diesel was the most numerous. About 215 of this type were built in ten different shipyards. Consolidated Steel Corp., Ltd. of Wilmington, California built the largest number — about a quarter of all built. These ships were either named for knots, such as SS Emerald Knot or with a two-word name beginning with "Coastal", such as SS Coastal Ranger. About 65 of this subtype were complete for the US Navy. Those ships were generally named after counties in the U.S. the remainder stayed with the United States Maritime Commission (MARCOM) with a few exceptions.

On August 13th 1947 the Diamond Knot was plodding her way inbound in the Strait of Juan De Fuca to Seattle from Bristol Bay ports in Alaska with a cargo of more than 7.4 million cans of salmon. The fog was thick and she was not equipped with radar. At 1:15am, as the Diamond Knot rounded Point Wilson the outbound 10,681-ton freighter Fenn Victory with a small miscellaneous cargo, struck her broadside. The Fenn Victory’s prow penetrated the Diamond Knot hull a full fourteen feet. Now the two ships are locked together. Distress call goes out and the Matilda Foss and Foss No. 21 are the first on the scene. After hours of cutting the two ships are separated. The Fenn Victory is able to limp into port under her own power while the Diamond Knot is put under tow heading for Crescent Bay. At the entrance of Crescent Bay are some of the strongest currents of straits and with the flooding of two of the Diamond Knots holds the tugs were having a hard time making headway. At 8:45am there was a noticeable tug on the tow line and the crew members had to sever the hawser as the Diamond Knot had started her death plunge. The Diamond Knot went to her final resting place in 135 feet of water at 8:57am.

Insurance monies were paid out and the underwriters decided to offset their losses by salvaging the salmon. First, they salvaged $22,000.00 of fish oil by pumping air into the oil chamber. The oil was forced into a hose which reached the surface. Next, they went after the canned fish. By cutting holes into her side the salvagers were able to employ a giant vacuum. Thus saving more than 5,700,000 cans of salmon. The total gross recovery was $2,100,100!
ref. used 
[1]  boydski.com
[2]  en.wikipedia.org
 
 
US
pref. Google
 
 
WRECKS: DISABLED zoom out zoom in view full chart
chart
MV Diamond Knot (+1947)
US
More charts
Destruction lsland to Amphitrite Point Strait of Georgia - Strait of Juan de Fuca Cape Blanco to Cape Flattery San Francisco-Cape Flattery US San Diego to Aleutian Islands and Hawaiian Islands North Pacific Ocean Eastern Part The World
 
 
  Update statistics  
 
  Advertisement  
 
advertise
 
   
  search  
 
You may consider access to
search wreck
show prev. names
A-Z search
 
search chart:
chart catalogue
 
search owner/builder: