british Brocklebank T. & J. Ltd. - Thomas & John Sindia SV (1888~1900) Sindia SV (+1901)
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  Details  
 
general
nationality british
purpose transport
type barque - bark
propulsion sailing ship
date built 1887
status
unknown
details
weight (tons) 3068  grt
dimensions 100.28 x 13.72 x 7.92 m
material steel
rigging 4 masts
speed  
yard no. 204
IMO/Off. no. 93757
about the loss
cause lost ran aground (wrecked)
date lost 15/12/1901  [dd/mm/yyyy]
about people
builder
Harland & Wolff Ltd., Belfast & Glasgow
next owners
[1]Anglo-American Oil Co. Ltd., London
SV Sindia (+1901)
period 1900 ~ 1901
IMO/Off. no.: 93757
last owner
[2]Brocklebank T. & J. Ltd. - Thomas & John, Liverpool
SV Sindia
period 1888 ~ 1900
IMO/Off. no.: 93757
captain
about the wreck
depth (m.) 2 max. / -- min. (m)
orientation
protected yes
war grave
updates
entered by Allen Tony
entered 27/02/2008
last update Allen Tony
last update 08/07/2013
 
  Position  
 
Allen Tony27/02/2008
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  The Wreck today  
 

Allen Tony27/02/2008

Over the years since the shipwreck, the Sindia sank deeper into the water and sand, and as a result of an ongoing beach replenishment project by the United States Army Corps of Engineers, her entire hull and most of her valuable cargo lies totally buried beneath the sand. Prior to then, the tiller post could still be seen protruding from the beach. The Sindia has been the target of several aborted recovery attempts, the most recent having been approximately 10 years ago by an entity called Sindia Expedition, Inc., a New Jersey corporation comprised of various investors. After having sailed some 200,000 miles over the world’s oceans, on December 15, 1901, the ship sailed no more.

On Christmas Eve, 1970, the last surviving member of her crew, David Jackson, died in Philadelphia at the age o f 90. The wreck location was designated as an official historical site by the State of New Jersey in 1969. Sindia: Type: steel-hulled bark, USA Built: 1887, Ireland Specs: ( 329 x 45 ft ) 3068 gross tons, 34 crew Sunk: Sunday December 15, 1901 ran aground in storm - no casualties Depth: 0-5 ft depending on the tide
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  History  
 
Allen Tony27/02/2008The Sindia came to rest approximately 150 yards from the beach between 16th and 17th Streets, after losing her way in a storm on the way to New York City. Within a matter of hours, the Sindia began to wedge deeper and deeper into the sand, while her steel hull, unable to support the ship’s weight, cracked and the hold began to fill in with water and sand. The Sindia was built in 1887 by Harland and Wolff of Belfast, Ireland as hull no.

204, the same company that later built the Titanic, the Sindia was one of the last commercial sailing ships prior to the predominance of steam-powered ocean travel. Reported to have been named for Madagee Sindia, emperor of Hindustan from 1741 to 1749, she was 329.3 feet long, had a beam of 45.2 feet, a draft in the water of 26.7 feet, and weighed 3,068 gr oss tons. Rigged with double top and topgallant sails and royal sails, she was launched on November 19, 1887, and delivered to the T.J. Brocklebank shipping firm in Liverpool on February 6, 1888. In 1900, John D. Rockefeller’s Anglo-American Oil Company, a division of Standard Oil Company, purchased the Sindia for $200,000.00. The Sindia’s final voyage brought her to Asia, bringing containers o f kerosene to the Far East and returning with silk, camphor, porcelain, and other items to be sold in time for the Christmas holiday....

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About Builders
 Harland & Wolff Ltd., Belfast & Glasgow
Harland and Wolff was formed in 1861 by Edward James Harland and Hamburg-born Gustav Wilhelm Wolff. Based in Belfast at Queen’s Island, Harland and Wolff are a huge and very important shipbuilding company. The shipbuilding complex is only one of two yards left in the U.K. capable of building large merchant ships. The yard was most well known for building high-class transatlantic passenger liners and was considered to be the best in the world. The company has built over 1700 ships at four yards and has been in operation for over 135 years.

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  History  
 
Allen Tony27/02/2008The Sindia came to rest approximately 150 yards from the beach between 16th and 17th Streets, after losing her way in a storm on the way to New York City. Within a matter of hours, the Sindia began to wedge deeper and deeper into the sand, while her steel hull, unable to support the ship’s weight, cracked and the hold began to fill in with water and sand. The Sindia was built in 1887 by Harland and Wolff of Belfast, Ireland as hull no.

204, the same company that later built the Titanic, the Sindia was one of the last commercial sailing ships prior to the predominance of steam-powered ocean travel. Reported to have been named for Madagee Sindia, emperor of Hindustan from 1741 to 1749, she was 329.3 feet long, had a beam of 45.2 feet, a draft in the water of 26.7 feet, and weighed 3,068 gr oss tons. Rigged with double top and topgallant sails and royal sails, she was launched on November 19, 1887, and delivered to the T.J. Brocklebank shipping firm in Liverpool on February 6, 1888. In 1900, John D. Rockefeller’s Anglo-American Oil Company, a division of Standard Oil Company, purchased the Sindia for $200,000.00. The Sindia’s final voyage brought her to Asia, bringing containers o f kerosene to the Far East and returning with silk, camphor, porcelain, and other items to be sold in time for the Christmas holiday.

On her last, fateful journey, she travelled to Shanghai and then Kobe, Japan, before setting sail on July 8, 1901 for the 5-month, 10,000 mile voyage to New York City.
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Sindia SV (+1901)
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