american Us Navy - United States Navy USS Indianapolis (CA-35) (+1945)
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  Details  
 
general
nationality american
purpose war
type cruiser (heavy)
subtype/class Portland class cruiser (am.)
propulsion steam turbine
date built 1932
is nickname no
status
dead (not found) dead (not found)
details
weight (tons) 9800  grt
dimensions 185.9 x 20.1 x 5.3 m
material steel, armoured
engine 4 x steam turbines, 8 × White-Foster boilers, single reduction geared turbines, quad shaft, 4 screws
armament 9 × 8 in (200 mm)/55 cal guns (3x3), 8 × 5 in (130 mm)/25 cal AA guns, 8 × .50 in (12.7 mm) machine guns, 2 × OS2U Kingfisher floatplanes
power 107000  s.h.p.
speed 32.7  knots
yard no. 339
call sign
NABD  
NABD
about the loss
cause lost torpedo
date lost 30/07/1945  [dd/mm/yyyy]
casualties  883rank: 120
about people
builder
New York Shipbuilding Corp., New Jersey
owner
Us Navy - United States Navy
captain Charles B. Mcvey Iii, Capt.
no. of crew 1196
about the wreck
depth (m.)
orientation
visibility very bad
protected
war grave yes
references
references
  navsource.org
updates
entered by Lettens Jan
entered 12/11/2007
last update Gothro Phil
last update 03/06/2013
 
  Position  
 
Lettens Jan04/05/2009
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dist. homeportdist. homeport
ref. used
 Cressman R. J., Official Chronology of the U.S. Navy in WWII
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  The Wreck today  
 

Lettens Jan12/11/2007

Several expeditions have been organised to find here, but to no avail. She lies in very deep waters.

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copyright: Unknown - onbekend - inconnu
 
 copyright: Unknown - onbekend - inconnu copyright: US Federal Government copyright: Unknown - onbekend - inconnu 
 
 copyright: Unknown - onbekend - inconnu copyright: Unknown - onbekend - inconnu  copyright: Unknown - onbekend - inconnu 
 
 copyright: Unknown - onbekend - inconnu copyright: Unknown - onbekend - inconnu   
 
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  History  
 
Lettens Jan12/11/2007USS Indianapolis, a 9,800-ton Portland class heavy cruiser, was built at Camden, New Jersey. Commissioned in November 1932, she operated in the Atlantic and Pacific during the peacetime years. During the 1930s, she hosted President Franklin D. Roosevelt on several occasions, among them a voyage to South America in November and December 1936.

Following the U.S. entry into World War II, Indianapolis operated with carrier task forces in the southwestern Pacific until Spring 1942, when she took up station in the Alaska area. She served there for over a year, sinking a Japanese transport in February 1943. Later in 1943, Indianapolis became Fifth Fleet flagship. In that role, into mid-1944, she took part in operations to capture the Gilberts, Marshalls and Marianas, plus strikes on Japanese positions elsewhere in the central Pacific. She also participated in the Peleliu invasion in September 1944....

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ref. used: 
  history.navy.mil


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About Owners
 
Us Navy - United States Navy

John Paul Jones - An American Naval Hero and known as father of the American Navy.

John Paul was born in a gardener's cottage in Kirkbean, Kirkcudbrightshire, Scotland. He went to sea as a youth and was a merchant shipmaster by the age of twenty-one. After killing a mutinous sailor at Tobago he added 'Jones' to his name and began a new life in America. He volunteered early in the War of Independence to serve in his adopted country's infant navy, and managed to obtain a lieutenant's commission in the Continental Navy.

He took the war to the enemy's homeland with daring raids along the British coast and the famous victory of the BONHOMME RICHARD over the HMS SERAPIS. After the BONHOMME RICHARD began taking on water and fires broke out on board, the British commander asked Jones if he had struck his flag. Jones replied, "I have not yet begun to fight!" In the end, it was the British commander who surrendered. Jones is now remembered for his indomitable will, his unwillingness to consider surrender when the slightest hope of victory still burned.

In 1781 he returned to America and Congress passed a vote of thanks to him for the way he had sustained the honour of the American fleet and in 1787 awarded him a gold medal. He also received a gold sword and the Order of Military Merit from Louis XVI.

Throughout his naval career Jones promoted professional standards and training. He spent the remaining years of the war advising on the establishment of the navy and the training of naval officers.

In 1792 Jones was appointed U.S. Consul to Algiers, but in July of that year he died before the commission arrived. He was buried in Paris and his body lay in an alcohol filled coffin in an unmarked grave for over a century. In 1905 his remains were found and taken to the United States where, in 1913, they were finally laid to rest in a marble sarcophagus in the U.S. Naval Academy Chapel at Annapolis, Maryland

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About Builders
 New York Shipbuilding Corp., New Jersey
New York Shipbuilding (New York Ship) was established in 1900 by Henry G. Morse, with the financial support of Andrew Mellon and Henry Frick. It was designed as a state-of-the-art shipyard and was called New York Shipbuilding because it was originally intended to be located on Staten Island. In 1916, it was bought by American International Corp. and W. R. Grace, and expanded for the war effort, but it struggled in the post-war years and was sold to American Brown Boveri in 1925. The yard was fully operational as World War II approached and the Navy invested $25 million to expand its capability. At its peak, New York Ship employed 30,000 people. It continued in both naval and merchant shipbuilding after WWII but closed in 1967. The shipyard was just upstream from the Walt Whitman Bridge: it is now part of the Port of Camden.

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  History  
 
Lettens Jan12/11/2007USS Indianapolis, a 9,800-ton Portland class heavy cruiser, was built at Camden, New Jersey. Commissioned in November 1932, she operated in the Atlantic and Pacific during the peacetime years. During the 1930s, she hosted President Franklin D. Roosevelt on several occasions, among them a voyage to South America in November and December 1936.

Following the U.S. entry into World War II, Indianapolis operated with carrier task forces in the southwestern Pacific until Spring 1942, when she took up station in the Alaska area. She served there for over a year, sinking a Japanese transport in February 1943. Later in 1943, Indianapolis became Fifth Fleet flagship. In that role, into mid-1944, she took part in operations to capture the Gilberts, Marshalls and Marianas, plus strikes on Japanese positions elsewhere in the central Pacific. She also participated in the Peleliu invasion in September 1944.

In February and March 1945, Indianapolis, again flagship of the Fifth Fleet, joined in attacks on Iwo Jima, the Japanese home islands and the Ryukyus. During the latter operation, on 31 March 1945, she was damaged by a Kamikaze plane. In late July, following repairs, Indianapolis made a high speed transit from California to Tinian to deliver atomic bomb components. She then sailed for the Philippines. Shortly after midnight on 30 July 1945 she was torpedoed by the Japanese submarine I-58 and sank quickly. Due to communications and other errors, her loss went unnoticed until survivors were seen from a passing aircraft on 2 August. Rescue efforts over several days saved only about a quarter of her nearly 1200-man crew.
ref. used: 
  history.navy.mil
 
 
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USS Indianapolis (CA-35) (+1945)
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