british British Royal Navy - Admiralty - RN HMS Association [+1707]
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general
nationality british
purpose war
type Ship of the Line
subtype/class 2nd rate Ship of the Line
propulsion sailing ship
date built 1697
status
live live
details
weight (tons) 1459  grt
dimensions 50.29 x 13.72 x 5.64 m
material wood
rigging
speed  
about the loss
cause lost ran aground (wrecked)
date lost 22/10/1707  [dd/mm/yyyy]
casualties  max.680rank: 175
about people
builder
British Royal Navy - Admiralty - RN, London
owner
British Royal Navy - Admiralty - RN, London
captain Edward Loades
about the wreck
depth (m.)
orientation
protected
war grave
updates
entered by Allen Tony
entered 26/10/2007
last update Allen Tony
last update 17/01/2012
 
  Position  
 
Lettens Jan01/10/2009
latitudeUK hydro member
longitudeUK hydro member
AISUK hydro member
mark add position to my marks (+/-5miles)
dist. homeportdist. homeport
ref. used
 UK Hydrographic Office
position disp.
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  The Wreck today  
 

Lettens Jan06/08/2007

Is on the Gilstone Ledges, but only with permission of salvor-in-possession Jim Heslin of the Isles of Scilly Underwater Centre. 30.000 coins recovered since relocation of wreck by sport divers in 1967. Nearly 1.000 coins found each year, although many are very worn. Most discovered in crud near iron cannon among boulders in gullies, which can plunge to more than 40m. Stern has yet to be found. Beware rough water and big swells on Gilstone.
ref. used
 HSAC

Allen Tony26/10/2007

HMS Association and her sister ships lay undisturbed on the seabed for almost 260 years before being eventually discovered by a group of Royal Navy divers, under the command of Engineer-Lieutenant Roy Graham, in 1967. A first attempt to find the wrecks had to be abandoned, and Mr Graham recalled some years later: "The weather was so bad, all we achieved was the sight of a blur of seaweed, seals and white water as we were swept through the Gilstone Reef and fortunately out the other side." The next attempt located HMS Association on the Gilstone Ledge, where divers spotted cannons and gold and coins. The following few years saw a rash of treasure-hunters diving on the wrecks, the most well-known being Roland Morris and his team from Penzance, who succeeded in raising a number of im portant finds.
ref. used
 Western Morning News.

Lettens Jan04/04/2013

UK hydro member
ref. used
 UK Hydrographic Office


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 copyright: Unknown - onbekend - inconnu copyright: UK Hydrographic Office copyright: Unknown - onbekend - inconnu copyright: Unknown - onbekend - inconnu 
 
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  Hydrographic Service UK  
   
  History  
 
Allen Tony26/10/2007HMS Association was a 96-gun second-rate ship of the line, launched at Portsmouth dockyard in 1697. She served as the flagship of Sir Clowdisley Shovell in the Mediterranean during the War of the Spanish Succession and was involved in several engagements, including the capture of Gibraltar in 1704. Commanded by Captain Edmund Loades, she was returning from the Mediterranean with Sir Clowdisley on board in late October 1707.

Legend has it that on the fateful night of October 22, Sir Clowdisley was repeatedly warned by his fellow officers that his judgement of the ships´ longitudinal position was incorrect. One account even claims that Sir Clowdisley ignored the advice of a seaman with knowledge of the Isles of Scilly who asserted that the fleet must be several miles off course because he co uld distinctly detect burning kelp in the air - a smell which was at the time so synonymous with the archipelago. The vessel smashed into the Gilstone Rocks, Isles of Scilly and sank. Like HMS Association, Firebrand also smashed into the Gilstone, but unlike the unfortunate flagship she was lifted off by a huge wave. Crippled and leaking, her commanding officer, Captain Francis Piercy, was guidedby St Agnes´s blazing light - at the time the only such warning in all of Scilly....

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Lettens Jan06/08/2007Associacion; 1459 tons; 90-gun man o´ war, built Portsmouth, 1697. 165 x 45 ft. Flagship of Admiral Sir Cloudesley Shovell. A vast treasure in chests of gold and silver coins and plate put on board in Gibraltar by British merchants trading in Spain and Portugal. More chests contained government funds for war with France, Sir Cloudesley´s own wealth and many regimental funds and silverware. Estimated value today: £5 million.

Sunk: 22 October, 1707, by navigation error when she ran into the Scilly rocks in the dark. Sir Cloudesley and crew of 650 lost. More than 1000 lost from other ships following flagship.
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 HSAC
Lettens Jan04/04/2013UK hydro member
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 UK Hydrographic Office


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About Owners
 
British Royal Navy - Admiralty - RN, London

In 1509 when Henry VIII was crowned he realised the growing navel power of King James IV of Scots. James had built an impressive fleet to control the Western Isles and was allied to France. Henry built up of his own fleet, the Navy Royal, as it was then known. New ships were constructed, the best known being the Mary Rose. Smaller types of warships (galleases) combining the best features of oars, sails and guns were also built. By Henry's death in 1547 his fleet had grown to 58 vessels.

In 1546 a 'Council of the Marine' was established which later became the 'Navy Board'. The Navy Board was in charge of the daily administration of the navy until 1832 when it was combined with the Board of the Admiralty.

Elizabeth I inherited a fleet of only 27 ships in 1558. Instead of building up her own fleet Elizabeth encouraged private enterprise against Spain's new empire. Men like Sir John Hawkins and Sir Francis Drake to command groups of Royal and private ships to attack the Spanish. When Spain threatened invasion with its Armada in 1588 the Navy of England both Royal and private defended the realm.

Early in the Seventeenth Century, larger galleons were built with heavier armaments. the largest English ship was Sovereign of the Seas built for prestige purposes by Charles I in 1637. The first ship with three gun decks to carry her 102 guns, she was the most powerful ship in the world for many years.

When King Charles II came to the throne in 1660 he inherited a huge fleet of 154 ships. This was a permanent professional national force and the beginning of the Royal Navy as we know it today.

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About Builders
 British Royal Navy - Admiralty - RN, London
In 1509 when Henry VIII was crowned he realised the growing navel power of King James IV of Scots. James had built an impressive fleet to control the Western Isles and was allied to France. Henry built up of his own fleet, the Navy Royal, as it was then known. New ships were constructed, the best known being the Mary Rose. Smaller types of warships (galleases) combining the best features of oars, sails and guns were also built. By Henry's death in 1547 his fleet had grown to 58 vessels.

In 1546 a 'Council of the Marine' was established which later became the 'Navy Board'. The Navy Board was in charge of the daily administration of the navy until 1832 when it was combined with the Board of the Admiralty.

Elizabeth I inherited a fleet of only 27 ships in 1558. Instead of building up her own fleet Elizabeth encouraged private enterprise against Spain's new empire. Men like Sir John Hawkins and Sir Francis Drake to command groups of Royal and private ships to attack the Spanish. When Spain threatened invasion with its Armada in 1588 the Navy of England both Royal and private defended the realm.

Early in the Seventeenth Century, larger galleons were built with heavier armaments. the largest English ship was Sovereign of the Seas built for prestige purposes by Charles I in 1637. The first ship with three gun decks to carry her 102 guns, she was the most powerful ship in the world for many years.

When King Charles II came to the throne in 1660 he inherited a huge fleet of 154 ships. This was a permanent professional national force and the beginning of the Royal Navy as we know it today.

read more
 
 
  History  
 
Allen Tony26/10/2007HMS Association was a 96-gun second-rate ship of the line, launched at Portsmouth dockyard in 1697. She served as the flagship of Sir Clowdisley Shovell in the Mediterranean during the War of the Spanish Succession and was involved in several engagements, including the capture of Gibraltar in 1704. Commanded by Captain Edmund Loades, she was returning from the Mediterranean with Sir Clowdisley on board in late October 1707.

Legend has it that on the fateful night of October 22, Sir Clowdisley was repeatedly warned by his fellow officers that his judgement of the ships´ longitudinal position was incorrect. One account even claims that Sir Clowdisley ignored the advice of a seaman with knowledge of the Isles of Scilly who asserted that the fleet must be several miles off course because he co uld distinctly detect burning kelp in the air - a smell which was at the time so synonymous with the archipelago. The vessel smashed into the Gilstone Rocks, Isles of Scilly and sank. Like HMS Association, Firebrand also smashed into the Gilstone, but unlike the unfortunate flagship she was lifted off by a huge wave. Crippled and leaking, her commanding officer, Captain Francis Piercy, was guidedby St Agnes´s blazing light - at the time the only such warning in all of Scilly.

Piercy steered Firebrand between St Agnes and Annet, but she sank close to Menglow Rock, losing 28 of her crew of 40. The sole survivor from the other three ships was George Lawrence, who had worked as a butcher before joining the crew of Romney as quartermaster. Sir Clowdisley Shovell´s name has become synonymous with an act of arrogant bloody-mindedness that led not only to his own death, but that of 1,500 other sailors. Whether that view is an accurate portrayal of his role in the 1707 disaster is hardly relevant. The fact is, rightly or wrongly, Sir Clowdisley has gone down in history as the man who lost HMS Association, plus Eagle, Romney and Firebrand.
 
 
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HMS Association [+1707]
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