american Us Navy - United States Navy USS Warrington (DD-383) (+1944)
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general
nationality american
purpose war
type destroyer
propulsion steam
date built 1935
status
unknown
details
weight (tons) 1850  grt
dimensions 116.13 x 11.01 x 4.27 m
engine 2 x GE Geared Steam turbines, dual shaft, 2 screws
power 52000  s.h.p.
speed 39  knots
call sign
NIRG  
NIRG
about the loss
cause lost gale/storm
other reasons hurricane
date lost 13/09/1944  [dd/mm/yyyy]
casualties  max.248rank: 388
about people
builder
Federal Shipbuilding & Drydock Co., Kearny (New Jersey)
owner
Us Navy - United States Navy
captain
no. of crew 321
about the wreck
depth (m.)
orientation
protected
war grave
updates
entered by Claes Johnny
entered 17/09/2007
last update Allen Tony
last update 19/12/2013
 
  Position  
 
Claes Johnny17/09/2007
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  History  
 
Allen Tony14/01/2009USS Warrington (DD-383), a Somers-class destroyer, was the 2nd ship of the United States Navy to be named for Lewis Warrington, who was an officer in the Navy during the Barbary Wars and the War of 1812. He also temporarily served as the Secretary of the Navy. The second Warrington was laid down on 10th October 1935 at Kearny, New Jersey, by the Federal Shipbuilding and Drydock Company; launched on 15th May 1937.

Two days out of Norfolk, along the Florida coast, the two ships encountered heavy weather. In the afternoon, Warrington received word that she was steaming directly into a hurricane. Later that evening, the storm forced the destroyer to heave to while Hyades continued on her way alone. Keeping wind and sea on her port bow, Warrington rode relatively well through most of the night. Wind and seas, however, continued to build during the early morning hours of the 13th. Warrington began to lose headway and, as a result, started to ship water through the vents to her engineering spaces. The water rushing into her vents caused a loss of electrical power which set off a chain reaction. Her main engines lost power, and her steering engine and mechanism went out. She wallowed therein the trough of the swells—continuing to ship water....

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Lettens Jan12/11/2007USS Warrington (DD-383) sank during hurricane off Florida. 248 drowned. 13 Sep. 1944.
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About Owners
 
Us Navy - United States Navy

John Paul Jones - An American Naval Hero and known as father of the American Navy.

John Paul was born in a gardener's cottage in Kirkbean, Kirkcudbrightshire, Scotland. He went to sea as a youth and was a merchant shipmaster by the age of twenty-one. After killing a mutinous sailor at Tobago he added 'Jones' to his name and began a new life in America. He volunteered early in the War of Independence to serve in his adopted country's infant navy, and managed to obtain a lieutenant's commission in the Continental Navy.

He took the war to the enemy's homeland with daring raids along the British coast and the famous victory of the BONHOMME RICHARD over the HMS SERAPIS. After the BONHOMME RICHARD began taking on water and fires broke out on board, the British commander asked Jones if he had struck his flag. Jones replied, "I have not yet begun to fight!" In the end, it was the British commander who surrendered. Jones is now remembered for his indomitable will, his unwillingness to consider surrender when the slightest hope of victory still burned.

In 1781 he returned to America and Congress passed a vote of thanks to him for the way he had sustained the honour of the American fleet and in 1787 awarded him a gold medal. He also received a gold sword and the Order of Military Merit from Louis XVI.

Throughout his naval career Jones promoted professional standards and training. He spent the remaining years of the war advising on the establishment of the navy and the training of naval officers.

In 1792 Jones was appointed U.S. Consul to Algiers, but in July of that year he died before the commission arrived. He was buried in Paris and his body lay in an alcohol filled coffin in an unmarked grave for over a century. In 1905 his remains were found and taken to the United States where, in 1913, they were finally laid to rest in a marble sarcophagus in the U.S. Naval Academy Chapel at Annapolis, Maryland

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About Builders
 Federal Shipbuilding & Drydock Co., Kearny (New Jersey)
Federal Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Company was a subsidiary of U.S. Steel. Its Kearny shipyard was developed for the WWI war effort and managed to stay fully operational throughout the inter-war years. It expanded its capabilities for the WWII effort, with the aid of $10mm from the Navy, and developed a second shipyard, in Port Newark, with another $20mm from the Navy. Both yards closed permanently after WWII and were liquidated. The Kearny yard was on the Hackensack River, at Kearny Point, just south of the southerly of the two Routes 1 and 9 bridges:

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  History  
 
Allen Tony14/01/2009USS Warrington (DD-383), a Somers-class destroyer, was the 2nd ship of the United States Navy to be named for Lewis Warrington, who was an officer in the Navy during the Barbary Wars and the War of 1812. He also temporarily served as the Secretary of the Navy. The second Warrington was laid down on 10th October 1935 at Kearny, New Jersey, by the Federal Shipbuilding and Drydock Company; launched on 15th May 1937.

Two days out of Norfolk, along the Florida coast, the two ships encountered heavy weather. In the afternoon, Warrington received word that she was steaming directly into a hurricane. Later that evening, the storm forced the destroyer to heave to while Hyades continued on her way alone. Keeping wind and sea on her port bow, Warrington rode relatively well through most of the night. Wind and seas, however, continued to build during the early morning hours of the 13th. Warrington began to lose headway and, as a result, started to ship water through the vents to her engineering spaces. The water rushing into her vents caused a loss of electrical power which set off a chain reaction. Her main engines lost power, and her steering engine and mechanism went out. She wallowed therein the trough of the swells—continuing to ship water.

She regained headway briefly and turned upwind, while her radiomen desperately, but fruitlessly, tried to raise Hyades. Finally, she resorted to a plain-language distress call to any ship or shore station. By noon on the 13th, it was apparent that Warrington´s crewmen could not win the struggle to save their ship, and the order went out to pre pare to abandon ship. By 1250, her crew had left Warrington; and she went down almost immediately. A prolonged search by Hyades, Frost, Huse, Inch, Snowden, Swasey, Woodson, Johnnie Hutchins, ATR-9, and ATR-62 rescued only 5 officers and 68 men of the destroyer´s 20 officers and 301 men. Warrington´s name was struck from the Navy List on 23rd September 1944.
 
 
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