british British Royal Navy - Admiralty - RN HMS Ark Royal (+1941)
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  Details  
 
general
nationality british
purpose war
type aircraft carrier
propulsion steam
date built 1938
status
live live
details
weight (tons) 22000 
dimensions 243.84 x 28.86 x 6.95 m
material steel
engine 6 Admiralty 3-drum boilers, 3 Parsons geared turbines
armament 8x2.4.5in AA, 48x2-pdr 'pom-pom' AA, 8x4x12.7mm/0.50cal machine guns
power 103000  s.h.p.
speed 31.75  knots
about the loss
cause lost torpedo
other reasons capsized
date lost 14/11/1941  [dd/mm/yyyy]
casualties  max.1rank: 666
about people
builder
Cammell Laird & Co., Birkenhead
owner
British Royal Navy - Admiralty - RN, London
captain
about the wreck
depth (m.) 900 max. / -- min. (m)
orientation
protected
war grave
updates
entered by Allen Tony
entered 25/03/2009
last update Allen Tony
last update 17/11/2011
 
  Position  
 
[1] Lettens Jan12/03/2010
latitudeUK hydro member
longitudeUK hydro member
remarksCalculated as '25 mile E [90°] from UK, Gibraltar'.
AISUK hydro member
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dist. homeportdist. homeport
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  copyright: Unknown - onbekend - inconnu  copyright: Spanish Hydrographic Institute 
 
 copyright: Unknown - onbekend - inconnu copyright: Unknown - onbekend - inconnu copyright: Unknown - onbekend - inconnu copyright: Unknown - onbekend - inconnu 
 
 
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  History  
 
Allen Tony17/11/2011The exact location of the wreck remained unknown until December 2002, when it was finally located 50 kilometers off Gibraltar under 900 meters of water.
Allen Tony17/11/2011ARK ROYAL

British Navy, air craft carrier; 1938; Cammell Laird; 22,000 tons; 800x94.7x22.8; 103,000 s.h.p.; 31.75 knots; turbine engines; 3-drum boilers; sixteen 4-5 in. guns, four 3pdr., 14 A. A.m.g., 60 aircraft.

The aircraft carrier Ark Royal, Capt. L. E. H. Maund, achieved much fame in the Second World War before her loss in 1941. She participated in the chase of the German battleship Bismark, which her aircraft attacked and torpedoed, and she served with the wellknown "Force H" under Vice-Admiral Somerville, steaming 205,000 miles on war operations. ...

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ref. used 
 Hocking C., Dictionary of Disasters at Sea during the Age of Steam


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About Owners
 
British Royal Navy - Admiralty - RN, London

In 1509 when Henry VIII was crowned he realised the growing navel power of King James IV of Scots. James had built an impressive fleet to control the Western Isles and was allied to France. Henry built up of his own fleet, the Navy Royal, as it was then known. New ships were constructed, the best known being the Mary Rose. Smaller types of warships (galleases) combining the best features of oars, sails and guns were also built. By Henry's death in 1547 his fleet had grown to 58 vessels.

In 1546 a 'Council of the Marine' was established which later became the 'Navy Board'. The Navy Board was in charge of the daily administration of the navy until 1832 when it was combined with the Board of the Admiralty.

Elizabeth I inherited a fleet of only 27 ships in 1558. Instead of building up her own fleet Elizabeth encouraged private enterprise against Spain's new empire. Men like Sir John Hawkins and Sir Francis Drake to command groups of Royal and private ships to attack the Spanish. When Spain threatened invasion with its Armada in 1588 the Navy of England both Royal and private defended the realm.

Early in the Seventeenth Century, larger galleons were built with heavier armaments. the largest English ship was Sovereign of the Seas built for prestige purposes by Charles I in 1637. The first ship with three gun decks to carry her 102 guns, she was the most powerful ship in the world for many years.

When King Charles II came to the throne in 1660 he inherited a huge fleet of 154 ships. This was a permanent professional national force and the beginning of the Royal Navy as we know it today.

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About Builders
 Cammell Laird & Co., Birkenhead
Charles Cammell and Co, iron and steel founders, was established in 1824. Cammell, Laird and Co. was formed in 1903 when the Laird Brothers amalgamated their company with Charles Cammell and Co. - - The Cammell Laird site at Birkenhead on Merseyside was established in 1824, and has been successfully building, repairing ships right through to present times. The shipyard is in a world famous maritime region and is recognised internationally as having been at the forefront of the British Shipbuilding Industry. - - - - - - - Cammell Laird used to have their own flag. The flag was used on ships that were in their trials. Only when approved by the buyer, she changed flags

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  History  
 
Allen Tony17/11/2011ARK ROYAL

British Navy, air craft carrier; 1938; Cammell Laird; 22,000 tons; 800x94.7x22.8; 103,000 s.h.p.; 31.75 knots; turbine engines; 3-drum boilers; sixteen 4-5 in. guns, four 3pdr., 14 A. A.m.g., 60 aircraft.

The aircraft carrier Ark Royal, Capt. L. E. H. Maund, achieved much fame in the Second World War before her loss in 1941. She participated in the chase of the German battleship Bismark, which her aircraft attacked and torpedoed, and she served with the wellknown "Force H" under Vice-Admiral Somerville, steaming 205,000 miles on war operations.

On several occasions her loss was falsely announced in enemy newspapers and broadcasts. The ship bore a complement of 1,600, the largest carried by any British man-of-war up to that time, her complement of 60 aircraft was also the largest among British carriers.

On November 13th, 1941, at about 4.30 p.m. when returning to Gibraltar after a cruise in the Mediterranean the ship was attacked by a German submarine U-81. She was struck by a torpedo on the starboard side below the waterline and immediately developed a heavy list, but was taken in tow for 12 hours until 4.30 a.m. on the 14th when she turned over and sank.

At the time of her loss she was 25 miles E. of Gibraltar. Of the Ark Royal´s very large complement one man was lost and one was seriously injured, all the crew being transferred to the escorting destroyers when it was realised that there was no chance of saving her.
ref. used 
 Hocking C., Dictionary of Disasters at Sea during the Age of Steam
 
 
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HMS Ark Royal (+1941)
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