american Us Navy - United States Navy USS Shark (SS-174) (+1942)
report an error
       
  Details  
 
general
nationality american
purpose war
type submarine
subtype/class Porpoise class submarine (am.)
Porpoise class submarine (am.) Pompano USS (SS-181) (+1943)
propulsion diesel and batteries
date built 1933
status
unknown
details
weight (tons) 2000  disp (subm)
dimensions 87 x 7.6 x 4.2 m
material steel
engine 4 × Fairbanks-Morse Model 38D8? opposed piston diesels, 1,365 hp each, one Fairbanks-Morse Model 7-38A5¼ opposed piston auxiliary diesel, 2 × 120-cell Gould AMTX33HB batteries, 4 × high-speed Allis-Chalmers electric motors, 10,910 hp each, with reduction gears, 2 shafts
armament 4 x 21" torpedo tubes (bow), 2 x 21" torpedo tubes (stern), 16 torpedoes, 1 x 3"/50-calibre deck gun
power 4300  h.p.
speed 19.5  knots
call sign
NAZB  
NAZB
about the loss
cause lost gunfire - shelled
date lost 11/02/1942  [dd/mm/yyyy]
casualties  max.54rank: 587
about people
builder
Electric Boat Co., Groton
engine by
Fairbanks-Morse, Chicago
owner
Us Navy - United States Navy
captain Shane, Jr. Louis Lt Cdr
complement 54
about the wreck
depth (m.)
orientation
protected
war grave
references
references
  navsource.org
updates
entered by Allen Tony
entered 11/01/2009
last update Gothro Phil
last update 11/02/2012
 
  Position  
 
Pablobini25/02/2009
latitudehydro member
longitudehydro member
AIShydro member
mark add position to my marks (+/-5miles)
dist. homeportdist. homeport
ref. used
  uboat.net
position disp.
show neighbour. wrecks members only
insert new position
 
  The Wreck today  
 
insert wreck site info
 
  Movies  
  insert new movie  
 
  Pictures  
 
copyright: Unknown - onbekend - inconnu
 
 copyright: Unknown - onbekend - inconnu  copyright: Unknown - onbekend - inconnu copyright: Unknown - onbekend - inconnu 
 
 copyright: Unknown - onbekend - inconnu copyright: Unknown - onbekend - inconnu copyright: Unknown - onbekend - inconnu  
 
 
insert new picture
 
  History  
 
Allen Tony11/01/2009USS Shark (SS-174) was a Porpoise-class submarine, the fifth ship of the United States Navy to be named for the shark. Her keel was laid down by the Electric Boat Company in Groton, Connecticut, on 24th October 1933. She was launched on 21st May 1935. On 6th January 1942, USS Shark was almost hit with a torpedo from a Imperial Japanese Navy submarine. A few days later, she was ordered to Ambon Island, where an enemy invasion was expected.

On 27th January, she was directed to join the submarines patrolling in Strait of Malacca, then to cover the passage east of Lifamatola and Bangka Strait. On 2nd February, USS Shark reported to her base at Soerabaja that she had been depth-charged ten miles off Tifore Island and had failed to sink a Japanese ship during a torpedo attack. Five days later, s he reported chasing an empty cargo ship headed northwest, for which Admiral Wilkes upbraided her commanding officer. No further messages were received from the USS Shark. On the 8th February, she was told to proceed to Makassar Strait and later was told to report information. Nothing was heard and, on 7th March, USS Shark was reported as presumed lost, the victim of unknown causes, the first American submarine lost to enemy ASW....

read more


insert new history
 
  Documents  
  insert new document  
About Owners
 
Us Navy - United States Navy

John Paul Jones - An American Naval Hero and known as father of the American Navy.

John Paul was born in a gardener's cottage in Kirkbean, Kirkcudbrightshire, Scotland. He went to sea as a youth and was a merchant shipmaster by the age of twenty-one. After killing a mutinous sailor at Tobago he added 'Jones' to his name and began a new life in America. He volunteered early in the War of Independence to serve in his adopted country's infant navy, and managed to obtain a lieutenant's commission in the Continental Navy.

He took the war to the enemy's homeland with daring raids along the British coast and the famous victory of the BONHOMME RICHARD over the HMS SERAPIS. After the BONHOMME RICHARD began taking on water and fires broke out on board, the British commander asked Jones if he had struck his flag. Jones replied, "I have not yet begun to fight!" In the end, it was the British commander who surrendered. Jones is now remembered for his indomitable will, his unwillingness to consider surrender when the slightest hope of victory still burned.

In 1781 he returned to America and Congress passed a vote of thanks to him for the way he had sustained the honour of the American fleet and in 1787 awarded him a gold medal. He also received a gold sword and the Order of Military Merit from Louis XVI.

Throughout his naval career Jones promoted professional standards and training. He spent the remaining years of the war advising on the establishment of the navy and the training of naval officers.

In 1792 Jones was appointed U.S. Consul to Algiers, but in July of that year he died before the commission arrived. He was buried in Paris and his body lay in an alcohol filled coffin in an unmarked grave for over a century. In 1905 his remains were found and taken to the United States where, in 1913, they were finally laid to rest in a marble sarcophagus in the U.S. Naval Academy Chapel at Annapolis, Maryland

read more
 
About Builders
 Electric Boat Co., Groton
Electric Boat (EB) was founded in 1899 to build and promote John P. Holland's design of submarine, in direct competition with Simon Lake's Lake Torpedo Boat Company. In its first 25 years, it contracted with the US Navy for at least 85 submarines but subcontracted the actual construction. EB expanded its capability for the WWII effort, with the aid of $13mm from the Navy. After the war it continued as the world's leading submarine builder, which it remains today. It is owned by General Dynamics.

In addition to building submarines at Groton, EB established two subsidiaries during World War I. The Submarine Boat Company, in Newark NJ, was one of the three large builders of emergency cargo ships for the U.S. Shipping Board: it closed at the end of the war. The Electric Launch Company, (ELCO), in Bayonne NJ, built sub chasers for the Navy: it continued after the war, building recreational launches, and then built almost 400 PT boats in WWII. ELCO continues today, but under different ownership.


read more

Fairbanks-Morse, Chicago
Fairbanks Morse and Company was a manufacturing company in the late 19th and early 20th century. Originally a weighing scale manufacturer, it later diversified into pumps, engines, windmills, locomotives and industrial supplies until it was merged in 1958. It used the trade name Fairbanks-Morse.

There are three separate corporate entities that could be considered successors to the company, none of which represent a complete and direct descendant of the original company. All claim the heritage of the Fairbanks Morse and Company. Fairbanks Scales is a privately owned company in Kansas City, Missouri, that manufactures the scales. Fairbanks Morse Engine (FME) is a company based in Beloit, Wisconsin, that manufactures and services engines. Fairbanks Morse Pumps is a part of Pentair Water in Kansas City, Kansas, and manufactures pumps.


read more
 
 
  History  
 
Allen Tony11/01/2009USS Shark (SS-174) was a Porpoise-class submarine, the fifth ship of the United States Navy to be named for the shark. Her keel was laid down by the Electric Boat Company in Groton, Connecticut, on 24th October 1933. She was launched on 21st May 1935. On 6th January 1942, USS Shark was almost hit with a torpedo from a Imperial Japanese Navy submarine. A few days later, she was ordered to Ambon Island, where an enemy invasion was expected.

On 27th January, she was directed to join the submarines patrolling in Strait of Malacca, then to cover the passage east of Lifamatola and Bangka Strait. On 2nd February, USS Shark reported to her base at Soerabaja that she had been depth-charged ten miles off Tifore Island and had failed to sink a Japanese ship during a torpedo attack. Five days later, s he reported chasing an empty cargo ship headed northwest, for which Admiral Wilkes upbraided her commanding officer. No further messages were received from the USS Shark. On the 8th February, she was told to proceed to Makassar Strait and later was told to report information. Nothing was heard and, on 7th March, USS Shark was reported as presumed lost, the victim of unknown causes, the first American submarine lost to enemy ASW.

She was stricken from the Naval Vessel Register on 24th June. Post-war, Japanese records showed numerous attacks on unidentified submarines in Shark´s area at plausible times. At 01:37 on 11th February, for example, the Japanese destroyer Yamakaze opened fire with her five-inch guns and sank a surfaced submarine. Voices were heard in the water, but no attempt was m ade to rescue possible survivors.
 
 
The World
pref. Google
 
 
WRECKS: DISABLED zoom out zoom in view full chart
chart
USS Shark (SS-174) (+1942)
The World
More charts
Strait of Malacca to Banda Sea The World
 
 
  Update statistics  
 
  Advertisement  
 
advertise
 
   
  search  
 
You may consider access to
search wreck
show prev. names
A-Z search
 
search chart:
chart catalogue
 
search owner/builder: