french Forces Navales Libres - Free French Navy - FNFL SS Casamance (+1941)
report an error
       
  Details  
 
general
nationality french
purpose transport
type cargo ship
propulsion steam
date built 1921
status
unknown
details
weight (tons) 5817  grt
dimensions 119.2 x 17.1 x 7.8 m
material steel
engine 3 x steam turbines directly geared to one screw shaft and one bronze propeller
power  
speed 10  knots
IMO/Off. no. 167807
about the loss
cause lost foundered
date lost 17/02/1941  [dd/mm/yyyy]
casualties  max.9rank: 654
about people
builder
Ateliers & Chantiers De La Loire, Nantes
engine by
Ateliers & Chantiers De La Loire, Nantes
last owner
[1]Forces Navales Libres - Free French Navy - FNFL
SS Casamance (+1941)
period 1940 ~ 1941
IMO/Off. no.: 167807
prev. owners
[2]Chargeurs Réunis (Cie. Française De Navigation Des Chargeurs Réunis), Paris
SS Casamance
period 1921 ~ 1940
captain Brias, Roger Emile
no. of crew 47
about the wreck
status dispersed
depth (m.) 15 max. / 5 min. (m)
orientation
position on seabed upright
visibility average
current weak
sea bed rocks
protected no
war grave no
references
references
 Racey Carl, A Century of Steamship Losses
updates
entered by Allen Tony
entered 17/10/2005
last update Avec43
last update 20/12/2013
 
  Position  
 
[1] Racey Carl14/09/2009
latitudehydro member
longitudehydro member
AIShydro member
mark add position to my marks (+/-5miles)
dist. homeportdist. homeport
ref. used
 Brian Clarkson, Whitby
position disp.
show neighbour. wrecks members only
more positions
insert new position
 
  The Wreck today  
 

Lettens Jan06/08/2007

Wk is in 33 metres.

Brittain Colin16/05/2009

Today the wreck lies 500 metres, south of Skinningrove. It is almost fully collapsed and well dispersed. Some of the hull plating and ribs can still seen, as well as one of the vessels boilers. It is a good wreck for rummaging around especially with its low tidal location. It is rarely dived as a result of its inshore location and the need for a boat.

 

ref. used
 Colin Brittain, eskside.co.uk


insert wreck site info
 
  Movies  
  insert new movie  
 
  Pictures  
 
copyright: UK Hydrographic Office
 
 copyright: UK Hydrographic Office  copyright: Unknown - onbekend - inconnu copyright: Unknown - onbekend - inconnu 
 
     
 
insert new picture
 
  History  
 
Avec4324/02/2014

21.06.1940: quittant la France occupée pour rejoindre les Forces Navales Françaises Libres au Royaume Uni, recueillit 27 rescapés du HMS Prunella torpillé. 17.02.1941: pris dans la tempête, il fut drossé contre la côte près de l'embouchure de la Tees, Angleterre, perdant 8 hommes dont le capitaine qui fut par la suite fait Compagnon de la Libération, la plus haute distinction de la France Libre.

21.06.1940: Leaving occupied France to join the Free French Naval Forces in the UK, rescued 27 survivors of torpedoed HMS Prunella. 17.02.1941: caught in the storm, she was drifted against the coast near the mouth of the Tees River, England, losing eight men including the captain who was later made ​ Companion of the Liberation, the highest award of Free France.

21.06.1940: saliendo de la Francia ocupada para unirse a las Fuerzas Navales Francesas Libres en el Reino Unido, rescató 27 sobrevivientes del HMS Prunella torpedeado. 17.02.1941: atrapado en la tormenta, fue arrojado contra la costa cerca de la desembocadura del Rio Tees, Inglaterra, perdiendo ocho hombres, entre ellos el capitán que más tarde fue nombrado Compañero de la Liberación, la condecoración más alta de Francia Libre.

21.06.1940: saindo da França ocupada para se juntar às Forças Navais francesas Livres no Reino Unido, resgatou 27 sobreviventes do HMS Prunella torpedeado. 17.02.1941: apanhado na tempestade, foi empurrado contra a costa perto da foz do rio Tees, Inglaterra, perdendo oito homens, incluindo o capitão, que mais tarde foi feito Companheiro da Libertação, a mais alta condecoração da França Livre.
Racey Carl27/01/2010Built as the CASAMANCE for Cie des Chargeurs Reunis; Date of completion: 07/1921; 3 steam turbines DR geared to 1 single shaft; 10 knots; also reported as 1 steam turbine; This free French vessel was wrecked at the foot of High Cliffs, 500m South of Skinningrove; The wreck is owned by a Redcar man and was well salvaged and dispersed.
ref. used: 
 Racey Carl, A Century of Steamship Losses
Racey Carl27/01/2010In February 1941, the CASAMANCE was last but one in a convoy, on passage from West Africa via Hull for Glasgow, with a cargo of mahogany baulks, groundnuts and cocoa and manned by a cosmopolitan crew of 47. On February 17th, the convoy (WN.83 - Clyde - Methil) was proceeding south down the North Sea and was encountering treacherous weather conditions off the Yorkshire coast, when the ship’s engine broke down.

The vessel drifted ashore and became stranded offshore, at the base of the massive cliffs, between Skinningrove and Hummersea, about 9-miles south of Redcar. Thirty-seven of the crew got safely ashore in a steel lifeboat from the ship and a second boat, which was built of wood, was launched with the other ten men on board, however it was swamped by a huge wave and only one of the ten, survived, an able-seaman, Michel le Moan from Brittany.

Michel le Moan gave a graphic account of the incident through an interpreter at the inquest held later at Timm’s Coffee House at Skinningrove. He told the coroner, “I felt the ship aground soon after midnight and we found it was on the rocks near the coast. The sea was very rough and we decided to wait for a day”

"I saw two or three people come on to the shore and try to send us a line by rocket. Someone signalled a lifeboat was on its way and was due at 6 a.m. As no lifeboat had appeared by 10.30 a.m., we launched our own lifeboat in a very rough sea, even though we were afraid it would be smashed by the sea.” “Our boat, made of steel was supposed to carry 55 people, but we would not risk that number, the weather was too rough …and 37 went in her.”

“The second jolly-boat, made of wood, was launched with the remaining ten men aboard when the first boat was midway to the beach. The Captain decided that it seemed all right. We were 50 yards from the shore when our boat was caught by a heavy wave, got full of water and capsized.”Eight of the nine men that drowned were Free Frenchmen and they now lie buried in the tiny churchyard at Lyth, overlooking Whitby. ...

read more
ref. used: 
 Young, Ron, Shipwrecks Of The North East Coast Vol 2
Allen Tony26/06/2007Casamance was 391 feet in length.

insert new history
 
  Documents  
 
insert new document
 
 
  History  
 
Racey Carl27/01/2010In February 1941, the CASAMANCE was last but one in a convoy, on passage from West Africa via Hull for Glasgow, with a cargo of mahogany baulks, groundnuts and cocoa and manned by a cosmopolitan crew of 47. On February 17th, the convoy (WN.83 - Clyde - Methil) was proceeding south down the North Sea and was encountering treacherous weather conditions off the Yorkshire coast, when the ship’s engine broke down.

The vessel drifted ashore and became stranded offshore, at the base of the massive cliffs, between Skinningrove and Hummersea, about 9-miles south of Redcar. Thirty-seven of the crew got safely ashore in a steel lifeboat from the ship and a second boat, which was built of wood, was launched with the other ten men on board, however it was swamped by a huge wave and only one of the ten, survived, an able-seaman, Michel le Moan from Brittany.

Michel le Moan gave a graphic account of the incident through an interpreter at the inquest held later at Timm’s Coffee House at Skinningrove. He told the coroner, “I felt the ship aground soon after midnight and we found it was on the rocks near the coast. The sea was very rough and we decided to wait for a day”

"I saw two or three people come on to the shore and try to send us a line by rocket. Someone signalled a lifeboat was on its way and was due at 6 a.m. As no lifeboat had appeared by 10.30 a.m., we launched our own lifeboat in a very rough sea, even though we were afraid it would be smashed by the sea.” “Our boat, made of steel was supposed to carry 55 people, but we would not risk that number, the weather was too rough …and 37 went in her.”

“The second jolly-boat, made of wood, was launched with the remaining ten men aboard when the first boat was midway to the beach. The Captain decided that it seemed all right. We were 50 yards from the shore when our boat was caught by a heavy wave, got full of water and capsized.”Eight of the nine men that drowned were Free Frenchmen and they now lie buried in the tiny churchyard at Lyth, overlooking Whitby.

ref. used: 
 Young, Ron, Shipwrecks Of The North East Coast Vol 2
 
 
British Isles
pref. Google
 
 
WRECKS: DISABLED zoom out zoom in view full chart
chart
SS Casamance (+1941)
British Isles
More charts
River Tyne to River Tees River Tees to Scarborough River Tyne - Flamborough Head North Sea - Central Part North Sea - Southern Sheet British Isles British Isles Western Europe North Atlantic Ocean - Northern Part North Atlantic Ocean - Eastern Part The World
 
 
  Update statistics  
 
  Advertisement  
 
advertise
 
   
  search  
 
You may consider access to
search wreck
show prev. names
A-Z search
 
search chart:
chart catalogue
 
search owner/builder: