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26/02Jan LettensPhotos[1]
26/02Jan LettensList Of My Marks[3]
26/02Allen TonySs Conteverde First Worl Cup 1930[1]
22/02Kampel HeinzGhostship Kangaroa[0]
22/02Black JonathanHm Submarine Triton (N15)[4]
22/02Bescoby RogerCampeador V Wreck Isle Of Wight[0]
20/02See_VdInsert A New Owner[0]
05/02Racey CarlInyula[1]
01/02Laheyne DanielSS Halifax[2]
31/01Allen TonyLobster Boat Fair Wind[1]
26/01Loro EzioMutine Hms[0]
25/01Jones JonathanMv Seistan[0]
23/01Elderfield Jane1690s Cape Cod Mystery Wreck[1]
17/01Jan CareMerchant Ship Empire Stanley[2]
16/01Jens RasmussenBallot 1942-43 Final Log[1]
06/01Wendes DavidSs Fernside #144834[1]
05/01Saques IsabelLa Rata Santa Maria Encoronada[0]
30/12Philippe BellegoCollier Orne Sunk On 21th Dec 1917[2]
27/12Stallwood JanOld Photo Of Grounded Ship[1]
26/12Hendryckx ClaudeFluitschip 'Drie Gebroeders' 1792[0]
 
 WRECK ON THIS DAY... GMT+1   wreck
27/02/1944 Woodpecker HMS (U08) [+1944] wreck
Woodpecker HMS (U08) [+1944]At 20.11 hours on 20 Feb, 1944, U-256 fired two Gnats simultaneously from a bow and the stern tube at the 2nd Escort Group, escorting convoy ON-224, and claimed two destroyers sunk after hearing two detonations and sinking noises. In fact, HMS Woodpecker (U 08) (Cdr H.L. Pryse, RD) was hit by one torpedo and another detonated near HMS Starling (U 66) (Capt F.J. Walker, DSO and Bar). The sloop lost her stern and capsized and sank while under tow to port on 27 February.
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27/02/1916 Maloja SS [+1916] wreck
Maloja SS [+1916]S/S Maloja Struck a mine laid by the German submarine UC-6, 2½ miles south by west of Dover Pier at about 1030 am. She was on a voyage from London to Bombay with general cargo. The engines were put at full astern to take the way off the ship, and passengers and crew entered the boats. Unfortunately, due to flooding, the engines could not be stopped and the boats could not be lowered. Many were washed away as the vessel moved astern at 8 or 9 knots with a 75 degree list. Maloja sank in about 20 minutes with the loss of 155lives. The Dover tugs Lady Brassey and Lady Crundall were first on the scene, while the collier Empress of Fort William also endeavoured to give assistance, but was herself mined, her crew escaping without loss.
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27/02/1917 Evadne HMT [+1917] wreck
Evadne HMT [+1917]Evadne, built by Mackie & Thomson, Ltd., Glasgow in 1907 and operated at the time of her loss by Royal Navy, was a British navy trawler of 189 tons. On February 27th, 1917, Evadne was sunk by a mine from the German submarine UC-65 (Otto Steinbrinck), 8 miles south of the Owers lightvessel. 12 persons were lost.
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27/02/2010 Poderoso SS (+2010) wreck
Poderoso SS (+2010)1990: Navire déclaré Monument Historique après sa carrière à Valparaiso et aux soins de la Corporation Monument au Travail Naritime à Talcahuano (Chili). 2010: Chavira à son quai d'amarrage 1990: Ship declared historical monument after her career at Valparaiso Care Corporation Monument of Maritime Work, Talcahuano (Chile). 2010: capsized at her berth dock 1990: barco declarado monumento histórico después de su carrera en Valparaíso. Bajo la Corporation Monumento al Trabajo Marítimo, Talcahuano (Chile). 2010: vuelcó en su muelle de ancla 1990: Navio declarado monumento histórico depois de sua carreira em Valparaiso e aosos cuidados da Corporação Monumento ao Trabalho Marítimo Talcahuamo (Chile). 2010: emborcou no seu ancoradouro
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27/02/2010 Saint Jeremy MV (+2010) wreck
Saint Jeremy MV (+2010)The M/V Saint Jeremy (Ex M/V Araki) was laid up in the port of Talcahuano, Chile since the second half of the 90's. Due to the 4 tsunami waves of the 27th of February of 2010, this vessel was dragged from her anchoring position at the bay for about 10 to 12 Kilometres turning on her portside, remaining in this position since that date. Previously called, MV Atlan Rubi 1970-1975 MV IBN Korra 1975-1992 MV Mas Rose 1992-1994 MV New Iris 1994-1996 MV Araki 1996-1999 MV Saint Jeremy 1999-2010
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27/02/2010 Zuiderster 4 MFV (+2010) wreck
Zuiderster 4 MFV (+2010)Zuiderster 4 At the port of Talcahuano, Chile. Due to the tsunami of 4 waves dated 27th of February of 2010, this vessel was dragged from her anchoring position at the bay for about 10 to 12 Kilometres.
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27/02/1943 Lord Hailsham HMT (FY109) [+1943] wreck
Lord Hailsham HMT (FY109) [+1943]HMT Lord Hailsham (FY10) was part of the convoy escort for WP300 escorting eight merchant vessels from South Wales to Southampton when the convoy was attacked in the English Channel by German MTB's in Lyme Bay. Lord Hailsham was sunk by torpedo.
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27/02/1943 Modavia MV [+1943] wreck
Modavia MV [+1943]Modavia SS was a British Merchant vessel of 4,858grt of the Donaldson Line. In 1943 she was torpedoed and sunk by E-boats in Lyme Bay.
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27/02/1945 Corvus SS [+1945] wreck
Corvus SS [+1945]Corvus SS departed Garston on February 23rd 1945 on route for Plymouth with a cargo of 1,800 tons of coal, via Mumbles to change convoy. The vessel left Mumbles Head in the morning of February 26th and joined convoy BTC 81 near Scarwater Lightship (station in the rear of starbord column). She was torpedoed at 10:15 BST on February 27th 1945 by U-1018 (Burmeister), about 7. miles 253° from the Lizard (49 55N 05 22W). Her starboard side was ripped open, she developed a heavy list and sank within a couple of minutes. Out of a crew of 22 and 3 gunners, 6 crew and 2 gunners were killed or drowned.
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27/02/1916 Mecklenburg SS (I) [+1916] wreck
Mecklenburg SS (I) [+1916] S/S MECKLENBURG; Owned by the Stoomvaart Maatschappij Zeeland and built in 1909 by Fairfield Co.; 2,885 tons; 349.8x42.7x16.4 ft.; 1,130 n.h.p.; triple-expansion engines. On February 27th, 1916, the Dutch steamship Mecklenburg was on voyage from Tibury to Flushing, when she struck a mine and sank in the North Sea, near the Galloper Light Vessel. The mine was said to be placed by UC-7. UC-7 was sunk by a mine in the North Sea, August 21st 1916.
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27/02/1942 Langley USS (CV-1 AV-3) (+1942) wreck
Langley USS (CV-1 AV-3) (+1942)USS Langley (CV-1/AV-3) was the United States Navy´s first aircraft carrier, converted in 1920 from the collier USS Jupiter (AC-3). In 1937, she was converted from carrier to tender. On 27th February 1942, Langley, escorted by destroyers Whipple and Edsall, was attacked by 29 Japanese bombers, some 75 miles South of Tjilatjap. During the third raid, Langley took five hits and 16 crew members were killed. The topside burst into flames, steering was impaired, and the ship developed a ten-degree list to port and went dead in the water, as her engine room flooded. The order to abandon ship was passed and the escorting destroyers fired shells and two torpedoes into Langley, to prevent capture by the enemy and she sank.
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27/02/1943 Harstad HMT (FY1847) [+1943] wreck
Harstad HMT (FY1847) [+1943]On 27/02/1943 the HMT Harstad (FY1847), operating with a Norwegian crew, was torpedoed and sunk by E-boat in Lyme Bay.
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27/02/1865 Béarn PSS (+1865) wreck
Béarn PSS (+1865)The French ship Bearn, built in 1860 and owned at the time of her loss by Cie. de Messagrrie Maritimes was wrecked in 1865, off Punta de Castelhanos, Brazil.
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27/02/1915 Conway Castle (+1915) wreck
Conway Castle (+1915)In 1914, on her voyage down the coast of South America, SMS Dresden captured and sank the Hyades,3,352 tons on August 15th, the Holmwood, 4,223 tons, on the 26th.

Later, after joining up with Von Spec, she sank the North Wales, 3,691 tons on November 16th.

On February 27th, 1915, she sank the British barque Conway Castle, 1,694 tons.
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27/02/1941 Ramb I RM (+1941) wreck
Ramb I RM (+1941)In February 1941, as the East African Campaign started to go badly for the Italians, Massawa, Ramb I´s home port, became threatened. With the Italian colonial ship Eritrea and Ramb II, Ramb I slipped through the British blockade off Perim and sailed into the Indian Ocean on 20 February 1941. Ramb I was intended to raid shipping off the Dutch East Indies. Acting on reports of commerce raiders in the area, the Royal New Zealand Navy cruiser HMNZS Leander was sent to patrol the area of the Indian Ocean to the south and slightly west of India. On 27 February, Leander intercepted Ramb I off the Maldive Islands and challenged her. Ramb I attempted to bluff Leander with misleading signals but, although Ramb I was not flying Italian colours, Leander ordered her to stop. The Italian flag was raised and Ramb I simultaneously opened fire from 3,000 yards (3,000 m), splinters from her first salvo hitting the Leander. Leander replied with five salvoes within the next minute, leaving Ramb I seriously damaged and on fire. She struck her colours and Leander ceased firing. Ramb I had been badly damaged and, as Leander closed, the order to abandon ship was given. Ramb I was destroyed by an explosion after the majority of the crew had abandoned her. 113 men, including her captain, were rescued by the Leander, of whom one later died from burns. The survivors of Ramb I were disembarked at Addu Atoll and subsequently transported to prisoner of war camps in Colombo, Ceylon by the tanker Pearleaf.
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27/02/1942 Marore ? SS (+1942) wreck
Marore ? SS (+1942)Unarmed U.S. bulk carrier Marore is torpedoed, shelled, and sunk by German submarine U-432 off the North Carolina coast, 35°33´N, 74°58´W. U.S. tanker John D. Gill rescues 25 survivors; 15 more men land at Coast Guard Big Kinnakeet Lifeboat Station. There are no casualties.
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27/02/1809 Calypso (+1809) wreck
Calypso (+1809)44 canons, Partie de Lorient le 23 février 1809. Combat. 21 blessés et 10 passagers tués et 3 matelots. Chassé par quatre vaisseaux ennemis. Renflouée et remorquée au port ultérieurement. Vente de la frégate aux Sables. ; Voir "Cybèle" et "Italienne". "Le 24, à sept heures du matin, l´escadre de Brest étant par le travers de la pointe des Baleines, à la tête de l´île de Ré, on aperçut trois frégates françaises poursuivies par toute la division du contre-amiral anglais Robert Stopford, sauf deux frégates laissées en observation. C´était, du côté anglais, trois vaisseaux et une frégate ; du côté français, la Calypso, capitaine Louis-Leon Jacob ; l´Italienne, capitaine Pierre-Roch Jurien de la Gravière ; et la Cybèle, capitaine Raimond Cocault. Seules, de la division de Lorient, elles avaient pu sortir, le 23 à neuf heures du matin, avec l´aide d´embarcations qui les remorquaient, et venaient se ranger sous le pavillon de Willaumez ; les trois vaisseaux et les frégates armées en flûte, qui complétaient la division Troude, n´avaient pu prendre la mer faute de vent. Menacées par des forces d´une supériorité si disproportionnée, nos frégates furent s´embosser sous les batteries des Sables-d´Olonne et surent résister si bien à l´ennemi que celui-ci dut se retirer ; malheureusement elles restèrent échouées et furent perdues pour la marine militaire" «LES BRÛLOTS ANGLAIS EN RADE DE L´ÎLE D´AIX (1809)» DE JULES SILVESTRE.
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27/02/1809 Cybèle (+1809) wreck
Cybèle (+1809)Frégates 44 canons, partie de Lorient le 23 février 1809. "Le 21 février 1809, l´amiral Willaumez partit de Brest, avec une division de huit vaisseaux et deux frégates… Le 24, à sept heures du matin, l´escadre de Brest étant par le travers de la pointe des Baleines, à la tête de l´île de Ré, on aperçut trois frégates françaises poursuivies par toute la division du contre-amiral anglais Robert Stopford, sauf deux frégates laissées en observation. C´était, du côté anglais, trois vaisseaux et une frégate ; du côté français, la Calypso, capitaine Louis-Leon Jacob ; l´Italienne, capitaine Pierre-Roch Jurien de la Gravière ; et la Cybèle, capitaine Raimond Cocault. Seules, de la division de Lorient, elles avaient pu sortir, le 23 à neuf heures du matin, avec l´aide d´embarcations qui les remorquaient, et venaient se ranger sous le pavillon de Willaumez ; les trois vaisseaux et les frégates armées en flûte, qui complétaient la division Troude, n´avaient pu prendre la mer faute de vent. Menacées par des forces d´une supériorité si disproportionnée, nos frégates furent s´embosser sous les batteries des Sables-d´Olonne et surent résister si bien à l´ennemi que celui-ci dut se retirer ; malheureusement elles restèrent échouées et furent perdues. Cependant ce combat des Sables-d´Olonne fit grand honneur, à juste titre, aux trois capitaines français. Au coucher du soleil, toute la division Stopford prenait son mouillage derrière Chassiron. Ce combat des Sables fit 8 tués, 16 blessés. La CYBELE est absolument perdue coque défoncée, elle sera vendue aux enchères. L´armement est extrait. Voir ITALIENNE
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27/02/1809 Italienne (+1809) wreck
Italienne (+1809)44 canons, Partie de Lorient le 23 février 1809. Combat. 6 hommes tués et 17 blessés. Port d´armement Saint Servant. Vente de la frégate aux Sables, fin d´activité en 1810. ; Voir "Naufrages et naufragés sur les côtes de Vendée", de Constant Friconneau, p.27 à 32. ; OLONA, déc 2005, n°194, Les Marins de l´Empire, Voir "Cybèle" et "Calypso"
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27/02/1859 Princess PSS (+1859) wreck
Princess PSS (+1859)On February 27th, 1859, the American paddlesteamer PRINCESS, on voyage from Baton Rouge to New Orleans with about 400 passengers and a cargo of cotton, suffered a huge boiler explosion and burned out completely, 6 miles south of the Baton Rouge at Conrad Point. Between 75 an 100 people lost their life. Note : The steamer Princess was a first class passenger ship built in Cincinnati in 1855 and was a sistership of the Natchez V.
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27/02/1860 Nimrod PSS [+1860] wreck
Nimrod PSS [+1860]The NIMROD of Cork was a paddle steamer of 583-tons, rigged with sail, just in case the engines broke down. Built for the Cork Steamship Company, launched at Liverpool September 1843, for the Cork - Liverpool run. Carrying general cargo, passengers and soldiers to Cork, then cargo and Irish emigrants for Liverpool. Under the command of Captain Lyall, she then steamed out of Liverpool for Cork with around 45 passengers and crew, plus a cargo worth £10,000. Nearing Cork her engines broke down. Under sail she headed for Milford Haven, West Wales. Off the Smalls, the paddle steamer CITY OF PARIS came alongside. The two masters could not agree on a sum of money for towing NIMROD to Milford Haven, so they parted. After a short while it went from a moderate breeze to gale force winds, then to a full blown hurricane. With her sails in tatters she was seen being blown towards the 300 foot cliffs at St. David's Head. Over 300 people now waiting at St. David's Head with ropes and other rescue equipment at the ready, for they knew nothing would stop this vessel save the cliffs. As she neared the cliffs, Captain Lyall ordered the lowering of both anchors, and all her chains which was the last hope do saving his passengers, crew and vessel. The anchors held. The crowds on the cliffs are shouting, "They are saved, praise be to God, they are saved". "The steamer now faced the full fury of the hurricane winds and giant waves. Minutes passed, then in disbelief the crowd watched as one anchor chain broke, followed by the other. Now she was being pushed towards 300 foot cliffs at Porth-Llong. She struck about 10 a.m. Tuesday 28th February 1860 quickly breaking into three sections. The St. David's rescuers threw ropes down the cliff face, but the seas and winds were too high. In less than five minutes it was all over. There were no survivors. In June 1998, a team of divers led by shipwreck researcher/diver Jim Phillips went in search of NIMRODS cabinet which held the ship's silver cutlery. The cabinet was located in less than 14 minutes. Over 150 items were salvaged: silver folks, spoons all makes NIMROD, lead crystal decanters, and one brass button, marked '45th'. Records show that there were 45th Regiment soldiers aboard who were taking back a deserter to Ireland.
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27/02/1875 May Queen SV (+1875) wreck
May Queen SV (+1875)The May Queen, built in 1862 by Dinning, Quebec, Canada was a 1,069 grt. barque, owned by Thomson W. (Ben Line) of Leith. She burnt out in the Indian Ocean 27th February 1875 when on passage London to Rangoon.
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27/02/1884 Geofredo (part Of) [+1884] wreck
Geofredo (part Of) [+1884]Only for Hydrographic service subscribers.
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27/02/1884 Geofredo SS (part Of) [+1884] wreck
Geofredo SS (part Of) [+1884]Only for Hydrographic service subscribers.
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27/02/1890 Mexico SV (+1890) wreck
Mexico SV (+1890)The MEXICO was a former German barque which was initially lost on 09 December 1886 in a heavy storm off Birkdale, opposite the Birkdale Palace Hotel. The rescuing mission went wrong and in total 27 of 29 lifeboat members drowned. This event is still memorised in Great Britain as the greatest lifeboat disaster. MEXICO was refloated and later taken into service of L.T. Merrow & Son of Glasgow. The ship then finally was lost when it stranded in 1890 at Tantallon, Haddingtinshire (Scotland), whilst in ballast from the Falkland Islands.
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27/02/1893 Blair Athole SV (+1893) wreck
Blair Athole SV (+1893)SV Blair Athole went missing after sailing from Passoerean, Java with 2326 tons of sugar, on the 27th February 1893 when on route for Vancouver, BC. She was lost with all hands, 29 in total.
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27/02/1897 Alcester SV (+1897) wreck
Alcester SV (+1897)Built at Cartsdyke, Greenock. Grounded 27th February 1897 at Atherfield Ledge, Isle of Wight. Ship broke her back 01/03/1897 and was totally wrecked. No fatalities but most of her cargo of jute was lost.
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27/02/1897 Ariel SS (+1897) wreck
Ariel SS (+1897)The Dutch steamship Ariel, on a voyage from Amsterdam to Copenhagen, ran aground during a gale and was wrecked near Lemvig, Jutland.
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27/02/1903 Cambrian Prince (+1903) wreck
Cambrian Prince (+1903)Built for T. Williams & Co, Liverpool; Yard No 153; Launch Date: 10/1876; Owned at time of loss by Ship Cambrian Prince Ltd., Liverpool; Vessel foundered in force 10 gales with the loss of 19 of the 20 crew. On 27th February 1903 the CAMBRIAN PRINCE was on passage from Coquimbo to Middlesbrough with a cargo of Manganese ingots. This full rigged ship capsized & sank 25 miles off Whitby, in wind conditions SW force 10, with the loss of 19 of the 20 crew.
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27/02/1908 Elaine SS (+1908) wreck
Elaine SS (+1908) Elaine; 2337 tons; Owned by Lion Line Ltd.; On 27 February 1908, Elaine (T. Willons) with a cargo of timber and a crew of 30, was lost off Bunbury. All were rescued.
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